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romeo and juliet Act 3 Scene 1 is the scene that pivots the play toward being of a tragic genre

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare use dramatic devices in act 3 scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet in order to make it such an interesting exciting and important scene? Romeo and Juliet is a tragic play about two people bound by love and belonging to two different rival families. Although, both families equal in power and wealth, both have an undying hate for each other. It is a love story between Romeo and Juliet, set in the city of Verona. Act 3 Scene 1 is the scene that pivots the play toward being of a tragic genre; as the two people madly in love, have to be parted. It completely contrasts with the previous scene. ...read more.

Middle

Shakespeare then uses entrances and exits to good effect; as Benvolio has just warned Mercutio about the Capulets they enter the scene. Mercutio sees Tybalt and starts taunting him, but Tybalt ignores his insults, as he is trying to seek a fight with Romeo. However Romeo refuses, 'I do protest I never injured thee, but love thee better than canst devise, till thou shalt know the reason of my love; and so, good Capulet, which name I tender as dearly as my own, be satisfied.' Tybalt thinks Romeo is mocking him. This is a good use of dramatic irony; as the audience knows why Romeo 'protests' to fight Tybalt, Romeo wants a friendship, a truce between the two rival families; as he is deeply in love with Juliet, and now related, by law, to Tybalt and the rest of the Capulets. ...read more.

Conclusion

The citizens are up, and tybalt slain. Stand not amazed, the prince will doom thee death if thou art taken. Hence be gone, away!' Lady Capulet demands to the Prince, that Romeo must die, 'for blood of ours, shed blood of Montague.' Benvolio tells his view of events to the Prince. Benvolio is a narrator; he sides with neither friend, nor foe, even though everyone expects him to side with Romeo, he also refers to himself in the third person, but I think he does this in case people don't know of him, he says 'this is the truth or let Benvolio die'. Benvolio just wants to do what's right, and tell the truth, 'Tybalt, here slain, whom Romeo's hand did slay'. ?? ?? ?? ?? Name: Oli Harwood 7/03/06 Form: 10F ...read more.

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