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Romeo and Juliet - Directing a Scene.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet - Directing a Scene William Shakespeare is one of the most famous writers in the history of the English language. He was born in the town of Stratford-Upon-Avon. He wrote some of the most well known plays of which one of these is Romeo and Juliet. The story is set in Verona, Italy, and the main characters are, Romeo, Juliet, Tybalt and Mercutio. The story is about Rome and Juliet, two star-crossed lovers from two feuding families, the Montague family and the Capulet family who have been fighting on the streets of Verona for many years. At the start of the story Romeo has a crush on Rosaline who does not return love to Romeo. The Capulet family hold a party of which Rome attends un-invited. It is this party where Romeo and Juliet meet. After the party Tybalt, Juliet's cousin, sees Romeo and challenges him to a duel, Rome and his friends accept. Tybalt kills Mercutio, Romeo's best friend, and Romeo kills Tybalt. The prince of Verona banishes Romeo. Juliet plans to spend the night with Rome before he is sent away. Romeo and Juliet are married in Friar Laurence's church but Juliet's father has already arranged her marriage to a local nobleman Paris. ...read more.

Middle

He has understood his fate and is prepared to accept what is going to happen. In lines 26-35 Juliet is also beginning to accept what is going to happen, She encourages Romeo to leave her. I would want the actor to show that Juliet is worried. "It is, It is. Hie hence, begone, away." She would say these lines in a resolved, firm voice and would almost be pushing Romeo towards the balcony. Line 36 is Romeo's response to Juliet's sudden realization and it seems that Romeo and Juliet have changed roles since to start of the scene Romeo now being the persuasive manipulative person, "more light and light: more dark and dark our woes," and Juliet now playing the more levelheaded of the two. Line 41 is a dramatic phrase, "Then, window, let day in and let life out," at this Juliet will open the doors to the balcony and the lights will brighten. Romeo then steps over the balcony and begins to climb down. The two then kiss and Just the Two of Us by Bill Withers will play in the background. The next 5 lines are indisputably shattering lines. The actor should show Juliet as clearly distressed weeping at the sight of Romeo's decent. ...read more.

Conclusion

In lines 160/168 we see another outburst from Capulet just as bitter and evil, his love for his daughter is totally blanked out by his anger and lack of thoughtfulness. He threatens to hit his daughter and also threatens to throw her out on the street if she does not marry Paris. Snobbery is beginning to emerge in Capulet. I would want the actor to show that Capulet on the edge and about to lash out. Lines 197-202 show Juliet pleading to her mother. "I am too young, I pray you pardon me!" I would want the actress to beg on her knees and have Lady Capulet looking away from her daughter in disgust. The nurse in lines 214-226 does not agree with Juliet and she thinks that Juliet may never see Romeo again so she should 'cut her losses' and marry Paris. The Nurse should be speaking to Juliet in a consoling voice trying to calm Juliet down but we see in Juliet's last speech that this just infuriates Juliet more and Juliet has an outburst much like her fathers. "Ancient Damnation! O most wicked fiend." Insulting her nurse. I would want the actor to slap the nurse across the face and storm out off the stage at the end leaving the nurse shocked at the end of the scene. David Sinnott ...read more.

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