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Romeo and Juliet In this course work I will be seeing how Shakespeare shows Romeo's change of mood in Act 5, Scene 1.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet In this course work I will be seeing how Shakespeare shows Romeo's change of mood in Act 5, Scene 1. I will include what Romeo says and does as well as the audience reaction. I will also talk about Romeo's character in this scene, his visit to the apothecary and what happened to Juliet. By the time this scene is performed, Romeo has been banished from Verona and Juliet. The scene starts with Romeo in Mantua, where he hears the news of Juliet's death. Before he hears the news he is reminiscing a dream he had had the night before (lines 1-11), "I dreamt my lady came and found me dead-Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think..." When Balthasar enters, Romeo is very anxious to hear news from Verona and asks several questions. ...read more.

Middle

The mood of the play changes instantly. It becomes dark and evil. Romeos emotions become very clear in line 50. He is deeply depressed and it is evident that he has given up on life, "An if a man did need a poison now, (Whose sale is present death in Mantuna) Here lives a caitiff wretch would sell it him" Once Romeo has arrived at the Apothecary, his tone of voice changes from emotional to aggressive. He talks to the apothecary with a huge lack of manors. He orders the apothecary about, "Come hither, man. I see thou art poor. Hold, there is forty ducats; let me have a dram of poison, such soon speeding gear as will disperse itself through all the veins" The Apothecary is very reluctant to give Romeo the poison because of the law. ...read more.

Conclusion

As Romeo is leaving the apothecary he says, "Come, cordial, and not poison, go with me to Juliet's grave; for there I must use thee." This leaves the audience in a state of suspension as the scene comes to an end. Throughout this whole scene, Romeo has gone through all emotions possible for a man to go through. At the begging he is happy to see his friend. But as he finds out his love is dead he changes into a depressive mood. He arrives at the apothecary and is filled with anger and defiance. He feels as though the world has let him down. He shows this the whole time he is at the apothecary's. But as soon as he exits the apothecary he goes straight back to being depressed. Not only does Romeos mood change through this scene, so does the audience. Shakespeare has written this play using all his imagination possible. Romeo and Juliet is certainly one of the best plays ever written. Peter Ruscillo 11.1 ...read more.

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