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Romeo & Juliet.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� eg����d�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0�bjbj�2�2 #��X�XY��������PPPPPPPVzzz8� �V�.��������$� R F>P�����>PP��S����P�P������PP��� 0�Ħ=��z��i0��_�_�d��^PPPP_P� ����>>VV$z�VVzRomeo & Juliet I will go through my essay scene by scene as I think this is the most effective and more efficient way of comparing the two different versions of the story and thus answering the task question. I will start by giving an introduction of both stories. First of all, the Zefferelli version. His version of the Shakespear play is set around the time that the play was written by Shakespear around 1599a.d. Secondly, Baz Luhrman� s version made in the 1990�s and set in the 1990�s. The key scenes I will be studying are: The Opening Act 1 Scene 1 The Ball Act 1 Scene 5 The Balcony Act 2 Scene 2 The Fight Act 3 Scene 1 Ending Act 5 Scene 3 The Opening - Act 1 Scene 1 The opening scene in the Luhrman version is set in a typical U.S gas station. It is a busy and open area, much like the market setting portrayed in the original script, which is also busy. This is very clever of Luhrman because he is trying to modernise the original setting without losing the feeling of an open and busy area. A market square in modern America would be very strange. In the Zefferelli version, the director has tried to replicate the setting and atmosphere of the original, using a typical market square from the time that the play was written, this might seem to the audience as a more 'realistic� version of the play as the film is trying to be more identical to the original play. At the start of the scene in the Luhrman version we see the first of our families, the Montagues. They seem like typical American youngsters having fun in their car with the music turned up. They pull into a gas station and all seems well until the second family arrives, the Capulets. ...read more.

Middle

Juliet appears on the balcony, and speaks of her love for Romeo, she says that she doesn�t care that Romeo is a Montague, this shows the audience that the biggest factor in the pair being together peacefully cannot stop their love. The two versions are quite similar but have some obvious differences due to the modernisation of the play. First of all in Zefferelli�s version, we see Juliet walk towards the edge of her balcony. She speaks of her love for Romeo, she is so in love that she calls for him knowing there�s a good chance of him not returning the call, this is where the most famous line in the play comes in, 'O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?� Romeo hears this as he is hiding in a near by tree, and replies to her call. Juliet is obviously startled and surprised by his appearance but is still glad to see him. She fears for Romeos safety because if he gets caught he will be in big trouble, also she wonders how Romeo got to the balcony in the first place. His answer is that love enabled him to climb the walls easily. This shows another bond between the pair in that even death cannot keep Romeo apart from Juliet. The pair exchange vowels and agree to marry with no one knowing, Romeo eventually parts from Juliet and leaves the scene. The quietness and twilighty settings of the scene also help isolate the couple from the rest of the world, the romantic music that was used in the ball scene is used once again. Juliet is wearing a nightgown, which doesn�t really signify anything here, apart from maybe promoting the 'angelic� theme. In Luhrman�s version, Juliet once again enters the balcony area and speaks of her love towards Romeo. But in this version, as well as the language being original, it seems to be delivered more naturally, it seems more believable and passionate towards us. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think that Shakespear would have thought that Luhrman�s adaptation of his play would have presented his themes and images more clearly because Luhrman has modernised the play probably as good as if Shakespear himself directed the film if not better. The Zefferelli version I think Shakespear would have liked but just not as good as the Luhrman version My personal favourite is the Luhrman version, mainly because of the impact and creativeness of the final scene, other than that I think that the Zefferelli version is good, because it shows the audience what the play may have been like set back in Shakespears time. This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ Y�ÇÈ9�:���������������������������h�X�h�X�OJQJh�X�h�X�CJOJQJ%h�X�h�X�OJQJfHq� ����)h�X�h�X�CJOJQJfHq� ����h�X�"he)CJOJQJ^JaJmH sH �� - D ^ v � � ����"�"�'�+;c=�C�C*TnT�]Ba�f�f�����������������������������1$7$8$H$Y�����N�X�Y�ÈÉÊË:�;�<�=����������� �!��������������������������������������$a$gd�X�$a$gd�X�1$7$8$H$�������1$7$8$H$!��������������������...)()()()()()0P��/ ��=!�"�#��$��%�8�$����������@`�@ NormalCJ_H aJmH sH tH DA@�D Default Paragraph FontRi �R Table Normal�4� l4�a� (k@�(No List 4@�4 �X�Header ���!4 @4 �X�Footer ���!`�o�` �X�watermark header$a$CJOJQJfHq� ����N�o"N �X�watermark footer$a$ CJOJQJ������ ���z� ���z� ���z� ���z� ���z� ���z� ���z� ���z� �� �z�� �+�:�I�X�gcw�SZX�-L���-D^v��� ������#3c5�;�;*LnL�UBY�^�^�|N~XY���0���0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0���0���0��p�0��p�0�� ��0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��p�0��M90 Er�V�:���F���GIJ�H��alex�e)�X��@Y� ��@@��Unknown������������G��z ��Times New Roman5V��Symbol3&� �z ��Arial?5� �z ��Courier New7&�� �Verdana"���hU4�U4�U4�s�g $�s�g $�$���xx�553�����?���������������������e)��Romeo & JulietTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedalex�� ��Oh��+'��0����x� 4 DP l x � ������Romeo & JulietUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibiteduUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibiteduUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedu>Downloaded from Coursework.Info - http://www.coursework.info/is Normal.dotfalexl.d2exMicrosoft Word 10.0@@>��=��@>��=��@>��=�� s�g�� ��Õ.��+,��D��Õ.��+,��p,���H����� ���� � �UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoG��$5A Romeo & Juliet Titled@���+K_PID_LINKBASE CopyrightDownloaded FromCan RedistributeOwner�A4http://www.coursework.comcoursework.comehttp://www.coursework.com -No, do not redistributecoursework.com/ !"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJK����MNOPQRS����UVWXYZ[����]^_`abc��������f��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Root Entry�������� �Fp2Ϧ=��h�1Table��������LWordDocument��������#�SummaryInformation(����TDocumentSummaryInformation8������������\CompObj������������j������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���� �FMicrosoft Word Document MSWordDocWord.Document.8�9�q ...read more.

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