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Ropmeo and Juliet "Carefully analyse Act 3 Scene 1 and comment on how Shakespeare manipulates our responses to it and how this scene influences the audience's reaction to the remainder of the play"

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Introduction

ROMEO AND JULIET ACT 3 - SCENE 1 "Carefully analyse Act 3 Scene 1 and comment on how Shakespeare manipulates our responses to it and how this scene influences the audience's reaction to the remainder of the play" When we come to this part of the play, the long-standing feud of the Montague's and Capulet's has already been well established in the previous scenes. This feud has lost all reason or justification. All that remains hatred between them. Into this warring world comes the unlooked for love of Romeo and Juliet - truly "star crossed lovers" Act 3 Scene 1 begins with Benvolio and Mercutio in the town. Benvolio urges discretion "these days, the mad blood is stirring". He claims to be a peaceable man, but Mercutio denies this, reminding him of the many times Benvolio has picked a fight for the slightest of reasons "Thou art as hot a Jack as in thy mood as any in Italy". ...read more.

Middle

Both sides seem equally aggressive, who has the right? What, after all, is the argument? What is this, other than a common or garden street brawl between rival gangs? They are probably agreeing with Benvolio, who urges them to get out of "the public haunt of men" and stay out of trouble with the Authorities. At this point, Romeo, one of the star crossed lovers, attempts to help the situation. He is in love, he feels a connection to Tybalt, as a relation of Juliet, the old hatred has been diluted. Tybalt is almost family to him now. "The reason I have to love thee doth much excuse the appertaining rage to such a greeting" Of course, neither Tybalt or Mercutio are aware of this. Mercutio is furious "Oh calm, dishonourable, vile, submission". Why doesn't Romeo get stuck in with the rest of the Montague's? He is letting the side down. ...read more.

Conclusion

He had wanted to try peace, "respective leniety", but the death of his friend Mercutio had changed all that forever. From this point there is an awful inevitability about the unfolding tragedy. At the beginning of the scene, the audience is neither for nor against either side - now, sympathy is with Romeo. He did not want to be in this situation. When Tybalt wanted to fight, he "spoke him fair". But Tybalt, as Benvolio relates to the Prince, was "deaf to peace". It was not his fault. When Mercutio was killed, he could no longer stand by. Honour and revenge have meant that his life must change inexorably. He wanted only to love and be loved. Now he is to be exiled and hated. How can the audience feel anything but sympathy for him? Tybalt is dead. Mercutio is dead. Romeo is banished. The prince has no choice , he cannot pardon those that kill. The scene is set for the ensuing tragedy. The audience have their collective hankies out. ...read more.

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