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Staging A Scene From Romeo + Juliet

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Introduction

Staging A Scene From Romeo + Juliet Introduction For my essay I' am going to take one scene from the play 'Romeo + Juliet' and discuss how I would stage it for a modern audience. The famous love story is one of the most successful of all time. It was written in 1595 and has been translated into many different languages. The writer, William Shakespeare is the most well-known play writer of all time. He has written such plays as: - The Tempest (Comedy), Richard III (History), Macbeth (Tragedy) and Hamlet (Tragedy): All of which are in theatres today. Romeo + Juliet has also been the inspiration and the basis of many famous plays and films, Such as: - West Side Story (Play), Titanic (Film) Both of which have been very successful Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is a story of two 'star crossed lovers' who play out their love affair against a background of feuding and poisoned family relationships. In this essay I will be directing Act 1 scene 5. This scene is very important, as it sets where Romeo and Juliet meet, fall in love and realise each other's identities and also it is pivotal to the play. When directing this play, acting, costumes, set lighting, and sounds needs to be considered. The party begins When the party begins the use of costumes is very vital as it signifies their importance in the play. As it is a fancy dress party I think Juliet should be dressed up like a ballerina because it will emphasise that she is pure, holy and loving. Romeo should be hidden in armour because his costume will convey that he is brave and wanting to do whatever he thinks. ...read more.

Middle

Romeo and Juliet meet For this part I would make Romeo follow Juliet to the garden where she is taking fresh air. The garden is romantic, pretty with candles. At this moment Juliet is smelling a rose. Then the music should suddenly change to romantic music. Romeo then reveals his face behind his mask and Juliet does not stop gazing at him. Romeo then grabs Juliet's hands and holds them tight so he can't lose her or let go of her. Romeo is in control whilst Juliet is still gazing at him whilst Romeo is saying his lines. Romeo looks deeply into Juliet's eyes and finishes his words and kisses Juliet on the hand. Juliet then removes her hands away from Romeo, this demonstrates that Juliet is still too young to be going around and falling in love with people at first sight. Then Juliet speaks her lines gently and slowly which proves she is innocent and that she is still a young girl. When Juliet is saying her lines she is walking away to the side of the garden, Romeo is dragged behind. This also suggests that Juliet is in control. She is in control as she is leading Romeo and making him what she wants him to do. After reaching to the side of the garden, where the other people at the party cannot grab attention of them. They both stand and both join hands. They both start to giggle, as both of them know there wish is coming true. Both now know that each of them loves each other as a couple in love would. They then both fall back onto a couch. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is a lot of anger and tension between tybalt and Romeo when Tybalt finds out that Romeo is at the party. At this point there will be subtle background music but there will be angry music on top to create and visualise the suspense and tension between tybalt and Romeo. There should be red lighting on both of them therefore the audience can see the drama between the two characters and also showing Tybalt having a feeling of hatred. When Tybalt says, 'I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall/ Now seeming sweet convert to bitter gall,' we feel nervous, because we know this is foreshadowing a future violent event. The actor playing Tybalt wants the audience to feel tense; he will use his facial expression and have a very rigid body to show his rage at Capulet's favouring of Romeo. His exit should be very dramatic and he should glare at Romeo. Tybalt action should be very pugnacious when he first hears about Romeo's presence "A villain that is hither come in spite". He isn't very happy to see Romeo at the party, as Romeo is a Montague; in result he should use sharp and precise language to show his aggression. This bit of the play is very important because this is the scene where both themes of love and hate are contrasted by the meeting of Romeo and Juliet for the first time and where Tybalt sees Romeo and wants revenge. In lines 92 - 100 Romeo and Juliet meet again. They speak in sonnet form, which emphasises and articulates their devotion for each other. At this stage of the scene Romeo puts Juliet an a pedestal by using religious imagery. He describes his lips as 'two blushing pilgrims'. ...read more.

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