• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"The Amber Spyglass" by Philip Pullman - review

Extracts from this document...


Hatice Giritli Group 9 Friday 5th November 2004 My Book Review of the Week: The Amber Spyglass This week I chose to read the novel "The Amber Spyglass" by Philip Pullman. He was born in Norwich on 19th October 1946. The early part of his life was spent travelling all over the world, because his father and then his step father were both in the Royal Air Force. He spent part of his childhood in Australia, where he first met the wonders of comics, and grew to love Superman and Batman in particular. After he left school he went to Exeter College, oxford, to read English. He did a number of odd jobs for a while, and then moved back to Oxford to become a teacher. He taught at various middle schools for 12 years, and then moved to Westminster College, Oxford, to be a part-time lecturer. He taught courses on the Victorian novel and on the folk tale, and also a course examining how words and pictures fit together. ...read more.


He takes Lyra down to the world of the dead to rescue Roger and all the other dead people. Then they go to Lord Asriel who sacrifices himself to kill Metatron, the angel authority, to keep his daughter and Will safe. He and Mrs Coulter, Lyra's mum, work together to push Metatron into the Abyss but fall in to it with him. Then his task is to show the angels how to close a window that has been opened by the Subtle Knife so that all the windows can be closed because of the problems such as the loss of dust and the spectres. Philip Pullman uses a lot of description in his novels. He gives the readers the satisfaction they expect from the book:- well structured story line, good characters, interesting settings and plots, supreme elegance of style and tone, a richly inventive imaginative landscape, and, some very big ideas fearlessly explored. ...read more.


Given power by the Authority to see the worst in everyone, No-name and her compatriots plague the souls in the world of the Dead. Sattamax: Mulefa Elder who describes the inexplicable demise of the Seed Pod trees and enlists Mary to help his people find the cause and the solution to their dire situation. I think there is no target audience for this book because I think it can be read by all age groups. In conclusion I found the novel "The Amber Spyglass" just as interesting and enjoyable as the first two books in the trilogy. It uses a lot of imagination and descriptive words. Out of ten I would give "The Amber Spyglass" a ten because I enjoyed reading it and was hooked into the third and final book of the trilogy after reading the first chapter. I liked the way Philip Pullman added a small amount of what was happening in Lyra's dream in between the chapters. I recommend it to anyone and everyone!!!! By Hatice Giritli Group 9 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE JRR Tolkien section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE JRR Tolkien essays

  1. Lord of the Rings book report. Plot outline and themes.

    He bites off Frodo's finger and the ring and is overwhelmed with joy. He dances and jumps but jumps to far, he falls in the doom crack taking the ring along. Meanwhile, in front of the gates of Mordor the armies of Gondor and Mordor fight each other and Mordor

  2. Why is the Novel called The Remains of the Day?

    Maybe it is possible, if they do not serve their employers constantly, but Stevens, on his never-ending quest to become the perfect butler, is always using his stilted idiom and gets used to ignoring any kind of emotion. Miss Kenton mentions this when she tells Stevens that he, "Never hires any pretty girls, in case they become a distraction.

  1. Knights in the Middle Ages.

    Each of the weapons had a good meaning. The lance had a saying. It was said, "As fear of the lance drives back the unarmed, so the knight drives back the enemies of the church." As for the sword, it was said that, "The two edges of the sword show that the knight serves God and the people."

  2. Shrek - a review.

    A talking donkey is taken for trade by his owner. As the donkey refuses to talk the lady who owns him is not given anything however when they drag her away she kicks Tinkerbell (the fairy from Peter Pan) magic fairy dust goes on to the talking donkey and he says 'I can fly.'

  1. How do the makers of Shrek use presentational devices to reverse the tradition, to ...

    But Shrek's opening is original and something new for the viewer's eyes. The part when Shrek says, 'like that's ever going to happen' starts the turning point in this story. By the time the introduction music is over the viewers know that they are not fated for a conventional story.

  2. The Ultimate Tale.

    'He he he', muttered the man. Once inside the castle, the man, surprisingly, transformed into the Dark Lord Beryl and let out an evil cackle. 'Now you are captured, you stupid bearded fool, and I can use you to take over your fathers kingdom', explained Beryl.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work