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The Crucible - Act 2 from Reverend Hale’s entry to his exit.

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Introduction

The Crucible This passage is based on Act 2 from Reverend Hale's entry to his exit. Taken from 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller. The Crucible by Arthur Miller is a very complex and interesting book. Arthur Miller knows how to keep an audience captivated. The play was written during the period of American History commonly known as McCarthyism. Arthur Miller was convicted of being a communist sympathiser because he had signed a couple of petitions. What made Miller link these actions to the Salem witch-hunt was that the as like the Salem investigations people were brought forward to confess being a communist sympathiser and forced to name other people who also were communist sympathisers. McCarthy and his disciples all became just as paranoid as the Salem judges were. Any criticism was an offence of being a communist sympathiser. Therefore, for Arthur Miller the link between the Salem witch-hunt and the goings on at the time was crystal-clear Arthur already had obtained knowledge of the witch-hunts from his college days and the subject was refreshed even more when he read 'The Devil in Massachusetts' by Marion Starkey. ...read more.

Middle

Tension begins to mount between Proctor and Hale because of this. Suspense is built up when Hale asks Proctor to say all of the Ten Commandments. The audience are wondering whether Proctor will or will not recite all of them. When John makes a start on his recitation, the stage directions say that he begins to sweat. No doubt, Hale would have noticed this and this may lead him to believe that John was not as strong a Christian as the other people believed him to be. When Giles Corey and Francis Nurse enter there is even more tension added to the situation as both of their wives have been taken away on suspicion of witchcraft. Proctor is deeply concerned on two levels: For the safety of Martha Corey and Rebecca Nurse; and the welfare of their husbands. Whether his own wife would be taken away like Giles' and Francis' wives. Hale on the other hand is shocked; he cannot believe that Rebecca Nurse had been charged with being a witch and arrested as well. This is probably the point when the audience notice a change in Hale's mood, before he was pompous with a degree of smugness as well; now he is ...read more.

Conclusion

John tells him, 'Mr Parris discovered them sportin' in the woods. They were startled and took sick'. Hale was obviously deeply shocked, and the audience would notice it too as if you look down the page you'll see it says: (His eyes wide): Abigail Williams told you it had naught to do with witchcraft! If the actor of Hale is a good one, he will show the audience how shocked he is to find out his new piece of information through his facial expression and his tone of voice. This scene is the turning point in the book this is when John decides to show his fury upon the 'court of justice', like an ocean falling upon the rocks is how he will fall upon the court. Hale realises what really is going on in the village of Salem is not witchcraft but Vengeance. John sees how much of a manipulative bitch Abigail can really be. This is the scene where everything takes a nosedive into the pit of Gehenna. Hale summed it up earlier when he said on page 58 'If Rebecca Nurse be tainted, then nothing's left to stop the whole green world from burning.' Hale's meaning was that if Rebecca was convicted of being a witch then nothing in the world would stop hell taking over earth. ...read more.

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