• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Crucible - How does Arthur Miller creates a sense of tension and conflict between John and Elizabeth Proctor at the beginning of Act 2?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Arthur Miller creates a sense of tension and conflict between John and Elizabeth Proctor at the beginning of Act 2? Arthur Miller's play The Crucible is set in Salem in 1692. At that time there was a lot of tension, as many people were being accused of witchcraft and being against G-d. In the play Miller shows how the accusations affected everyone in Salem. Miller creates a sense of tension by setting the scene in a "low, dark room." This room is quiet and gloomy as very little light is getting in. Miller does this to create an atmosphere which is unhappy and depressing. The tension is already high as the scene before ended with satanic accusations. The room is bare, which is unwelcoming, and it seems unlived in as nothing is out of place. Miller uses the scenery to bring atmosphere to the stage before the characters enter, he also uses the bareness to get the audience to focus purely on the actors and the dialogue. ...read more.

Middle

When Elizabeth and John converse they begin politely as if they are trying to be nice, but both characters seem tense when they are talking. John addresses his wife as "Elizabeth" when being affectionate, but this changes to "woman" as the tension rises. Elizabeth appears to be suspicious of John, we see this when John tells Elizabeth that he was alone with Abigail. This builds up most of the tension in the scene. Miller has done this to show how upset the character is. We can see this in the way Miller makes the character speak. "You where alone with her?" The action in this scene is minimal, Miller does this so the audience focuses on what Elizabeth and John are saying, rather than what they are doing. The movements they make are also there to show a change in the characters emotion, for instance when John stands to kiss Elizabeth; "he gets up goes to her and kisses her". ...read more.

Conclusion

Elizabeth is portrayed as a strong character which is unusual for this time. Miller makes her this way in order to create tension between John and Elizabeth. John is shown as a deceiver, as he is in the dominant of the two and keeps secrets from Elizabeth. We see proof of this when he adds more salt to the food that she had prepared earlier, without her knowledge, and later compliments her, "it's well seasoned". This is an empty complement. He further expresses his dominance by ordering her around "Woman. I'll not have your suspicion anymore". Men of this period where at a higher position in society they where seen to be strong and forceful, this is why John tries to press his dominance on her. Miller draws attention to this side of his character in order to heighten the sense of conflict between them. In The Crucible Miller wanted to create a sense of tension and conflict. He successfully used the beginning of act 2 to achieve this by clever use of lighting, sparse scenery, characterisation and dialogue. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Miller section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Miller essays

  1. How does Arthur Miller create tension in Act Three of "The Crucible"?

    Because "The Crucible" is a play, stage directions are hugely important in getting across to the audience the meaning, and particularly in this scene, the significance of how characters behave. A very crucial stage direction in the courtroom is when John and Abigail are told to turn around -though Abigail

  2. How does Miller create a sense of tension and conflict between John and Elizabeth ...

    Betty then takes fright and goes into a 'coma' resulting in Reverend Hale, a man with "much experience in all demonic arts", being called in to take a look. This then leads to the witch-hunt with 20 people dieing; 19 hanged and 1 pressed to death with stones.

  1. Analyse and discuss the way in which Arthur Miller presents the relationship between John ...

    Although Abigail goes on to say 'he bends to her' as if to say she is now in charge of him, this is likely to anger proctor as he is the powerful one, but he knows deep down that he needs to make it up to his wife somehow after

  2. How Does Arthur Miller Present The Characters of Abigail and Elizabeth and Shape Our ...

    As if he was trying to erase such a depressing thought from his wife's mind. Yet, she continues 'John, I counted myself so plain, so poorly made, no honest love could come home! Suspicion kissed you when I did; I never knew how I should say my love.

  1. How effective are the closing scenes in the play at resolving the conflict presented ...

    Therefore linking in with the rest of the play with private rooms having public consequences. In the setting of the play a high barred window is also mentioned, as well as showing that there is no escape for the prisoners it also shows the imprisonment of the people of Salem

  2. How Miller creates Tension and sustains the Reader's Interest in The Crucible

    'My wife will never die for me! I will bring your guts into your mouth but that goodness will not die for me!' This powerful sentence from Proctor gives the audience hope for Elizabeth and, at the same time, makes sure the audience knows that dramatic events are yet to come.

  1. How Does Miller Build Up The Dramatic Tension In Act 2?

    This is a mistake but Elizabeth is said to have never made a lie, she is feeling guilty and now Proctor suddenly seems to be in more control, like a role-reversal of earlier. Hale knows he is onto a large fault, rather than a small crack in Proctor's fortress.

  2. Drama GCSE (1699) Unit 2 Drama Exploration 2 - Response section

    This acting by Abigail is very smart- she diverts all the attention away from her. Abigail is kneeling looking up with her hand in her hair, this makes her look venerable and we pity her. Proctor challenges her in front of the court revealing the affair, although not proven, to

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work