• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The History and Context of Club Culture.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

THE HISTORY AND CONTEXT OF CLUB CULTURE "History is hard to know because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of history it seems entirely reasonable that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time, and which never explain, in retrospect, what really happened" (Hunter.S.Thompson, "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas") The late 1980's saw the emergence of a hugely significant social phenomenon. Rave culture (or club culture as it is now most commonly referred to), is of massive appeal to many young people and statistics by Mintel show that 15.7 million people in Britain go clubbing each weekend (Mintel:1996). Clubbing has become a major cultural industry and cities such as Sheffield, Leeds and Manchester to name but a few, all have well developed clubbing industries making a substantial contribution to the local cities economy. Many cities have actively pursued inner city regeneration programmes partially based on the nighttime economy and attraction of clubbers (Malbon 1999:6). Club culture has become a notable area of study for two main reasons. ...read more.

Middle

Whereas previous youth culture movements such as the punks or the hippies posed a threat to social order, club culture provided another way of dealing with an oppressive society - an option of temporary escapism. Rietveld has suggested that Acid House music was perfect to enable such escapism; "When one is in opposition, the thing that is opposed is acknowledged. When one escapes instead of opposes, no alternative moral values are proposed at all" (Hillegonda Rietveld quoted in Redhead et al 1993:66) The details of the emergence of club culture are complex, however the broad outline is clear. Acid House was the first genre of music to played in British nightclubs, its name holding heavy connections with the drug LSD. The roots of acid house lie with American black and gay club culture, and the music was imported from that being played in New York, Detroit and Chicago; "Out of New York, Chicago and Detroit had come sounds that would change the world of popular music: garage, house and techno, three interlinked strands with similar premises - the use of technology to heighten perception and pleasure, and the release from mundane, workaday existence into fanatic visions of drama, vitality and joy" (Collin 1997:24) ...read more.

Conclusion

It is no longer a separate underground leisure activity, it now has specialised (or niche) radio, television and written media, has created an abundance of jobs both directly and indirectly involved with the scene, and Dj's are no longer seen as faceless disc spinners, but are now household names to many and can arguably be described as 'celebrities'. Clubs such as 'Ministry of Sound' in London, 'Gatecrasher' in Sheffield and 'Cream' in Liverpool are all now globally recognised, producing a variety of albums each year which many young people buy without even being old enough to attend the club. Magazines such as 'Mixmag', 'Musik' and 'Ministry' have all referred to these clubs as 'brand names'. In addition to this the Island of Ibiza has been described as "the clubbing Mecca" (Mixmag June 2002), attracting thousands of young British clubbers each year with one aim - to club! Despite the massive possibilities this pastime holds for study "the latest and by a long way probably the largest and most influential of recent young people's cultures or styles in Britain can be found in club cultures" (Malbon 1999:16), the sociological literature on the topic is in fact quite sparse, and what is available tends to be quite diverse and with distinct preoccupations. 1 See Appendix for definitions ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparing poems section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Comparing poems essays

  1. Clash of cultures coursework

    meaning there will be no "next generation" where races of every kind will at last unite and live with equal wealth and social standing. However the difference between both of the diminishing relationships in the two stories is that Cathy and Naraian's relationship grows steadily worse as the story progresses,

  2. Discuss the Reasons Browning(TM)s Characters Have for Murdering Their Victims

    She thinks she is clever because she thinks that her husband thinks she is at the church weeping when actually she is plotting to kill his lover, this makes her feel good and proud about herself.

  1. Examine the way in which Culture affects the relationships of the main characters in ...

    that she leads a very sad and upsetting life as it says that her mother is weak and her father abuses and beats Veronica night after night. Veronica devotes her life towards her family so much that she refuses her chance of an education because she feels that it is

  2. Cultural Appropriation and Its Affects On Other Cultures.

    stereotypes that people have about Native Americans "are rooted in the typical childhood"; in the game kids play called "Cowboys and Indians".5 American movies have also contributed to these stereotypes, by wrongly depicting rituals and ceremonies it promotes this belief that people think Natives are "barbarians and savages".

  1. What can you learn about teenage fashion from source one?

    crime, religion, unemployment, not just about money and fashion. There obviously was but the sources do not tell us this. DOES SOURCE FOUR SUPPORT THE EVIDENCE OF SOURCES 1 2 & 3? EXPLAIN YOUR ANSWER. Source four is from the book, ENGLAND, HALF ENGLISH, written in 1961 by Colin Mcinnes.

  2. Comparison between Dulce et Decorum Est & The Last Night

    "A shower of scraps was thrown towards them" reiterates the animals they are being essentially treated as. As for the mental pain faced by the soldiers, it must surpass the physical by far. From the lies, to leaving their loved ones, the pain and the distant memories are even more difficult to face.

  1. Different Cultures

    In A Stench of Kerosene I understood that Guleri and Manak loved each other but North Indian cultural traditions made things harder for them. Due to her culture Guleri's life seems very dull. She does the same things every day of her life. "She counted the days to the harvest".

  2. What is a culture? How does it affect the behaviour of an individual?

    National culture differs in their perception of for whom the firm exist. For example, American based companies put importance on the benefit of shareholders, whereas for Germans and Swedes, emphasis is more on employee (Schneider, 2003). 3.National culture of Sweden Sweden, as described by the four-dimension model of Hofstede, has a low power distance (47), weak uncertainty avoidance (49)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work