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The love scene between George and Maire is often commented upon as the turning point in Translations by Brian Friel. How important do you consider this

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Introduction

The love scene between George and Maire is often commented upon as the turning point in Translations by Brian Friel. How important do you consider this scene to the play as a whole, and what impact does it have dramatically? This scene, in my opinion is the dramatic centre of Translations. The scene displays that George and Maire have fallen in love as they return from the dance together; the pair find it hard to communicate, and exhaust every method of communication before reciting place names to one another. The common language of the place names increases the tension between George and Maire until, finally, they kiss. The kiss is witnessed by Sarah who uses her new found talent of speech to tell Manus. The scene, in my view is very important as it is the catalyst for the disastrous events which follow, it leads to the disappearance of George, the search of Baile Baeg by new English soldiers, Maire's despair, and the imminent 'evictions and leveling of every abode'. The stage directions play a prominent part in the scene, they specify darkness and music being played, the music is significant as it is a common form of communication, everybody can relate to it. ...read more.

Middle

As the pair recite their names to one another, it is as if they are allowing one another into their hearts, as a gesture of love. The pair also try to communicate in Latin, common words of one another's language and using the elements, which increase the audience's suspense as the lovers desperately, try to get their meanings across. George's constant 'sorry-sorry?' and 'Oh my God' shows the desperation with which he tries to communicate and gives the audience an insight into how much he has grown to care for Maire. At the beginning of the scene, George and Maire, although speaking in different languages, are saying similar things: Maire: The grass must be wet. My feet are soaking. Yolland: Your feet must be wet. The grass is soaking. This would give a comic vibe, and the scene begins in an upbeat tone, two lovers in the first flush of love, excited and speaking at a fast pace, although not understanding one another, but still being on the same wavelength. The scene is touching as the pair echo one another and the audience realise their relationship is an impossibility; they have a distinct lack of communication and socially it would not be right; the audience is also reminded about Manus: Maire: Manus'll wonder where I've got to. ...read more.

Conclusion

Tension and suspense are added to the build up of the kiss, as after the couple have recited the place names and 'always' the pair are constantly moving towards and away from each other, increasing the anticipation of the kiss. When they do kiss it is sudden, breaking the tension of the long build up. The big revelation to the audience is of course, Sarah being witness to the kiss and saying 'Manus...Manus!' which shows that she has gone to tell him about George and Maire, bring the scene to a climax. It is also poignant that after Sarah has been given the gift of speech, she is now about to use it to tell her teacher and change everything in Baile Baeg, possibly costing George's life. As the scene acts as a microcosm of the play's messages, Friel displays the themes of translation, cultural differences and conflict of interests all in one scene. As a result, I think that this is a very important, if not the most important scene of the entire play, as the scenes before all build up to this moment, and the later events preceding it are all results of George and Maire's union. Brian Friel has also managed to keep the audience interested by using tension, pace, irony and suspense; and successfully brings the end of the act to a climax, keeping the audience engaged. ...read more.

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