• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The novel Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, occupies a unique place among Marquez's works because the narrative is both journalistic and fabricated. The author frequently uses journalistic techniques in his fiction

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Liang Chen The novel Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, occupies a unique place among Marquez's works because the narrative is both journalistic and fabricated. The author frequently uses journalistic techniques in his fiction. In most of his novels he creates a high level of interest in the very first line of the text, and employs many journalistic details based on close observation throughout the entire novel. This journalistic quality, the search for the facts, is in contrasted with the surrealism of this novel. The narrative outlines the events surrounding the murder of Santiago Nasar, a young man who is thought to have taken the virginity of Angela Vicario. On her wedding night, after discovering that she was no longer a virgin, Angela's husband, Bayardo San Roman, returns her to her mother's house. Angela's twin brothers, Pedro Vicario and Pablo Vicario, finds out from her that Santiago Nasar was the one who dishonoured their family and they set out to kill him. Throughout the entire book the reader is engaged in a mystified and confusing world of time and tales. ...read more.

Middle

"The week before, he'd dreamed that he was alone in a tinfoil airplane and flying through the almond trees without bumping into anything,"" These unusually detailed descriptions of Santiago's dreams contradicts the journalistic investigative style of the narrative, and sends the reader into several different abstract areas between reality and fiction that they would then have to disentangle from. Throughout the book, a sense of the surreal and confusion is shown, not only in the details of the story but also in the forms of the text. "Furthermore: all the many people he ran into after leaving his house at five minutes past six and until he was carved up like a pig..." So far in the novel the language used and the flow of the text has been in an almost tranquil sensation, the sudden change in the language and tone of the text, "...carved up like a pig..." breaks this calm feels and drags the readers back to reality. This realism is contradicting with the surreal plot of the novel. The coincidental incidents are also a good representation of magic realism. ...read more.

Conclusion

Though she is a whore, the description of her is so beautiful that the readers are misled to believe that she is an elegant lady. In the very last section of the book, Gabriel Garcia Marquez gives a very gruesome and detailed account of the very last minutes of Santiago Nasar's life. "...walk in a state of hallucination, holding his hanging intestines in his hands." "They were sitting down to breakfast when they saw Santiago Nasar enter, soaked in blood and carrying the roots of his entrails in his hands. Poncho Lanao told me: "What I'll never forget was the terrible smell of shit."" This very repulsive and very detailed account of Santiago's last minutes is giving the readers a sense of reality, this sense of reality is contradicting with the surreal and magic realism seen and felt throughout the book. Gabriel Garcia Marquez has used many accounts of magic realism in her novel, Chronicle of a Death Foretold. The factor that makes the book so puzzling to the readers would have to be the contradiction between the title and the actual format of the book. The constant jumping from past to present misplaces the readers in a labyrinth of time and confusion. 1190 words ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE John Steinbeck section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE John Steinbeck essays

  1. the general and his labyrinth

    However, the new Government that takes his place fails. This encourages him to return to his political affairs in order to accomplish his dream of continental unity, "I don't doubt it, said the General, all I had to do was leave to make the sun shine again" (Marquez, 72)3.

  2. A constant dreamer

    fright; his lips were curled back from his teeth, as if he was ready to spring at something, and he was growling to himself. He took not the slightest notice of his master or me, but stiffly and tensely walked across the grass to the iron gate.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work