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The protagonists in William Shakespeare's Hamlet and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men share many noticeable differences and very few similarities.

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Introduction

The protagonists in William Shakespeare's Hamlet and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men share many noticeable differences and very few similarities. There are many evident differences that the protagonists share: Hamlet is of a high social class, while both George and Lennie are from a far more lower social class; Hamlet is far more literate than both George and Lennie, while both George and Lennie speak very poor English and do not have much knowledge about anything; Hamlet is a very dark and secretive character, while George and Lennie are quite innocent and open. Also, the fact that both books were written in different time periods and in different countries makes almost every character in Hamlet very different than any other character in Of Mice and Men. ...read more.

Middle

He looks up to George greatly and believes greatly in the vision of the farm that George and him will own one day. Although, he is the simplest character in Of Mice and Men, he is perhaps the most significant, as he symbolizes innocence, which is the opposite of what Hamlet symbolizes. George is a quite significant character in Of Mice and Men since he is the character that has progressed the most since the beginning of the novel He obviously care deeply for Lennie and we can tell this by looking at his first line of dialogue in the novel: "Lennie, for God' sakes don't drink too much. You gonna be sick like you was last night." ...read more.

Conclusion

In Hamlet, Hamlet wishes to avenge his father's death, and the whole play is based on that issue. In Of Mice and Men, George and Lennie dream of owning a farm someday, which is the reason why they go to work for "The Boss" so that they could produce enough earnings to sustain them when they go to live alone. Hamlet, George and Lennie are very different characters that lack many similarities. They hardly share any similarities and think very differently. The fact that Hamlet was written in a completely different time period than Of Mice and Men gives provides us with a valid reason to why Hamlet is so much more different than both George and Lennie. His qualities are extremely different than those of George and Lennie and therefore it makes it quite difficult to find reasonable comparisons that all the protagonists share. ...read more.

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