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'The tragic end of Romeo and Juliet is inevitable because of fateful influence of the stars over the young lovers' future.'

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Introduction

"Romeo and Juliet" 'The tragic end of Romeo and Juliet is inevitable because of fateful influence of the stars over the young lovers' future.' The story of Romeo and Juliet, set in the sixteenth century, inevitably ended in tragedy. This was not all due to the control of the stars, otherwise known as, and generally believed in at the time, as fate. "A pair of star-crossed lovers." (Prologue, line 6.) This quote is found at the beginning of the play and accurately describes Romeo and Juliet; it says that the lovers were in a predicament from the beginning because of being doomed by fate. It is the main meaning of the prologue, because it verbalizes that the end was inevitable and that fate controlled the eventual outcomes. Fate may play a large part in the couple's story, but so does choice, chance and characters. All of these components go together to make up the eventual outcome. Friar Laurence chooses to try to help reconcile the two feuding families by marrying two of their offspring. It is by chance that Friar John could not deliver the note to Romeo due to him being put into quarantine at the last moment, leaving Romeo unaware of Juliet's fake state of death. ...read more.

Middle

Romeo did not mean for Mercutio to be killed, it was an accident. It may have been by chance that Tybalt killed Mercutio due to Romeo, but Romeo choose to try and intervene, therefore changing the future. Romeo's character affects the turn of events as he forgets his calm resolve and chooses to let "fire-eyed fury be my conduct now! (Act3, Scene1, Lines119-120). This meant that he allowed his character to control his conduct. Like usual, Romeo was hotheaded and passionate about his decision. Romeo choose to take revenge for Mercutio's death, and possibly to deal with his own guilt surrounding the events. He does this by ultimately deciding to murder Tybalt, Juliet's cousin, and by this point in the play, his own cousin. In his fit of rage, Romeo gave himself the future of banishment, making the lovers' outlook even bleaker. He knew the consequence of disrupting the peace in the town of fair Verona. For the Prince warned them all what will happen to the people involved in the next brawl, "If ever you disturb our streets again, / Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace." (Act1, Scene1, Line96-97.) ...read more.

Conclusion

Being confronted with a thirteen-year-old girl soon to be part of an arranged marriage, the audience would not have been shocked, as people in the western culture may be today. Although they probably would have been surprised by her rebellion against her father's decision. Her father's choice to try and arrange for he marriage to Paris only drives her further on in her plight to living with her husband, Romeo, and therefore pushes her into putting herself into a state of living death. This eventually created dead 'star-crossed lovers'. The age of the couple may also have affected the way they conducted their selves, not only does Romeo and Juliet's characters influence the ending, but so does nearly every other character in the whole anecdote. Everything contributes to the final, inevitable ending. In conclusion, Romeo and Juliet's ending was inevitable, but it cannot all be justified by fate. As proven by the evidence and explanations of the quotes, other components are involved, such as choice, chance and character. They all played large parts in the inescapable ending. The belief in fate did play a central part in controlling the different outcomes, but it was not the only theme involved. Words ~ 1233 Melissa Quazi Coursework Question 4/3/02 ~Page1~ ...read more.

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