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Themes are often displayed in novels to show that there is some thing people can learn. In the novel The Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, themes are often displayed as a role in the book.

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Introduction

Austin Richardson Mitchell - 1 3/19/00 English What Themes? Themes are often displayed in novels to show that there is some thing people can learn. In the novel The Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, themes are often displayed as a role in the book. Themes play an important part of the novel; some of which are learning through suffering and corruption by wealth and power. Herbert and Pip are good examples of displaying the theme, learning through suffering. Herbert learns by balling into debt and learning how to get a job and earn money himself. Although Pip helps in finding this job for Herbert, he still learned how to gain an increase in his pay. ...read more.

Middle

He waits patiently for the day when Miss Havisham will tell Pip that Pip and Estella are to be married, but that day never came. When Pip finds out who his benefactor is, he is very disappointed to learn that he is not meant for Estella and felt hurt because of this tragic event. Learning through suffering is an important theme portrayed in this novel and many others. Corruption by wealth and power is shown in traits of Pip and Miss Havisham. Pip shows his corruption when his benefactor makes him wealthy in London. When Joe comes to visit him for the first time in London his displays his corruption by treating him with no respect. ...read more.

Conclusion

She even taught Estella to take revenge on all male sex and to never love because she never had the chance. She luckily later discovered that she has been bad and mean to people so she decides to share some of her wealth with people such as Herbert, Mathew Pocket, and Estella. Corruption by wealth and power is a terrible trait to carry, but it is a good theme to be shown. Learning though suffering and corruption by wealth and power are two main themes illustrated in the novel. Charles Dickens shared many good characteristics in The Great Expectations. Themes are important aspects of every novel, and people can often learn from them. ...read more.

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