• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Themes are often displayed in novels to show that there is some thing people can learn. In the novel The Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, themes are often displayed as a role in the book.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Austin Richardson Mitchell - 1 3/19/00 English What Themes? Themes are often displayed in novels to show that there is some thing people can learn. In the novel The Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, themes are often displayed as a role in the book. Themes play an important part of the novel; some of which are learning through suffering and corruption by wealth and power. Herbert and Pip are good examples of displaying the theme, learning through suffering. Herbert learns by balling into debt and learning how to get a job and earn money himself. Although Pip helps in finding this job for Herbert, he still learned how to gain an increase in his pay. ...read more.

Middle

He waits patiently for the day when Miss Havisham will tell Pip that Pip and Estella are to be married, but that day never came. When Pip finds out who his benefactor is, he is very disappointed to learn that he is not meant for Estella and felt hurt because of this tragic event. Learning through suffering is an important theme portrayed in this novel and many others. Corruption by wealth and power is shown in traits of Pip and Miss Havisham. Pip shows his corruption when his benefactor makes him wealthy in London. When Joe comes to visit him for the first time in London his displays his corruption by treating him with no respect. ...read more.

Conclusion

She even taught Estella to take revenge on all male sex and to never love because she never had the chance. She luckily later discovered that she has been bad and mean to people so she decides to share some of her wealth with people such as Herbert, Mathew Pocket, and Estella. Corruption by wealth and power is a terrible trait to carry, but it is a good theme to be shown. Learning though suffering and corruption by wealth and power are two main themes illustrated in the novel. Charles Dickens shared many good characteristics in The Great Expectations. Themes are important aspects of every novel, and people can often learn from them. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Analysing and explaining Charles Dickens' Great Expectations; Chapter 1.

    When the convict catches Pip in the BBC's version a close up is use to show Pip's emotions. When the convict sees Pip and catches him in Leans film however the camera zooms in to show emotion on both the characters faces.

  2. What do you learn of London society from reading Great Expectations?

    He realises that he should not feel this way about Joe, but he does not seem to be able to help it. During the visit, Joe and Pip are no longer able to be comfortable and natural with each other.

  1. The themes that are introduced and emphasised in Chapter 8 of Charles Dickens Great ...

    She is his unattainable desire. He lusts after her beauty and sophistication. Her mockery of Pip and his language ('"He calls the knaves, Jacks, this boy... And what coarse hands he has! And what thick boots!"' 'Why, he is a common labouring-boy!'), encourages Pip to believe that he is ignorant (certainly not 'scholarly' as Joe Gargery declares him to be)

  2. Everyone can learn from their mistakes and everyone has a good and bad side.

    Dickens uses language to really emphasize the presentation of the characters. "I'll cut your throat", that line from the convict in Chapter 1 creates the impression that he is an evil and threatening man. But in chapter 39 he breaks out in tears and says to Pip that he's been

  1. What do we learn of Dickens as a Writer?

    What I also find weird about Miss Havisham is the description of her eyes, " sunken eyes". This is usually the appearance on an older person. " The dress had been upon the rounded figure of a young woman, and that figure upon which it now hung loose had shrunk to skin and bone."

  2. Parallelism's Role In Great Expectations

    As Pip conveys more and more feelings towards the characters, the characters begin to reveal themselves more and more thoroughly. He is often wrong about the characters and Dickens uses parallelism elegantly to create unique characteristics for each character and their outcomes.

  1. Comment on the Role of Imagery in Great Expectations.

    This brings the subject on to Estella, being cold and harsh in her nature rather like the appearance of Mrs. Joe. Estella is the adopted daughter of Miss Havisham, who in her nature is very cold and harsh. She even admits further on in the book that she has "no heart".

  2. Treatment of the hildren in Dickens' novels

    David instantly engages our sympathy as he did not reply rudely to Miss Murdstone and yet she replies in such a manner that he did. Also she does not ask of his name, but simply refers to him as boy.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work