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This scene is a turning point in the play, showing how Romeo is drawn into the violence that haunts Verona. He enters full of the optimistic joys of love; at the end, he flees into banishment, leaving behind him the bodies of Tybalt and Mercutio. Romeo an

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Introduction

Romeo And Juliet This scene is a turning point in the play, showing how Romeo is drawn into the violence that haunts Verona. He enters full of the optimistic joys of love; at the end, he flees into banishment, leaving behind him the bodies of Tybalt and Mercutio. At the beginning of the scene as Mercutio and Benvolio enter; Shakespeare is quick to build up the threat of danger. Straight away, Benvolio is making an excuse for why he Mercutio should withdraw, "I pray thee, good Mercutio, let's retire". Benvolio is simply trying to keep the peace, as he knows Mercutio has a short temper. He is obviously very worried about the threat of danger, as shown by his language, "I pray thee". The Montague's seemed worried, upon the arrival of the Capulet's, fearing that they may be irritated that they sneaked into the Capulet's party, but it seems that is not the reason for the apprehensiveness. Mercutio stirs trouble with Tybalt, but Tybalt doesn't really want to hurt Mercutio, as he knows he� s only teasing around, and Mercutio isn't a Montague, but Tybalt however wants a word with Mercutio� s good friend, Romeo. Tybalt settles the quarrel with Mercutio when Romeo turns up on the scene. ...read more.

Middle

The two almost come to blows, after Tybalt had insulted Mercutio, by insulting Romeo. This time Benvolio steps in; He poses that they should retire to a private place to end this quarrel, as he fears the consequences of another brawl in the street, yet Mercutio shoes his stubborn, cocky attitude again, remaining in his place, refusing to move. Romeo arrives and Tybalt changes his focus instantly. Tybalt no longer has any interest in Mercutio, saying, "peace be with you, sir, here comes my man". Mercutio does not back down though, he shows that he is loyal to Romeo and stands firm. Tybalt's first words to Romeo reveal his true hatred; his first words being, "thou art a villain". Romeo takes the side of Benvolio and try's to make peace, reasoning that he will not fight as Tybalt does not know everything about him. Tybalt then insults Romeo claiming that Romeo has done him injury, and challenges him to a fight. Romeo then reveals the fact unknown to Tybalt, the fact that he loves his family, and therefore will not fight Tybalt, who is his own family, due to his marriage to Juliet; reasoning with Tybalt, even going as far as to say 'And so good Capulet, which name I tender as dearly as my own, be satisfied�. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Tybalt falls, Romeo cries, "I am Fortunes Fool". This is because he knows that he has made a fatal mistake, and that he is the victim of bad luck. The Audience should also realise that although Romeo has defended his friend, he has committed Murder, and although people feel sorry for him, it is inevitable that he will be severely punished, surprising for Romeo, as previously he had been such a loving character. The audience should be shocked at Romeo's actions, as they know everything that goes on in the play, unlike the characters. Shakespeare presents this turning point in Romeo's life, as a dramatic turn of events. He concentrates on the two extremes of his behaviour. This makes Romeo's violence towards the end of the scene so much more surprising, as we never seem to read about any behaviour that is just average, its always extremely loving and caring, talking about Juliet, or avoiding violence at all costs; or extreme violence, killing Tybalt. The prince also plays a large part, in cautioning the families, as he adds to the seriousness of the crime, by banishing Romeo. This intensifies the nature of Romeo's crime. Overall Shakespeare concentrates on creating large differences between the two sides of Romeo, making his violence so much more of a shock to the audience. Mark Lever Mr. Pickering Page 1 of 3 ...read more.

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