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To Kill a Mocking bird - Consider how chapter twenty-four presents the ideas of hypocrisy, prejudice and dignity.

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Introduction

Consider how chapter twenty-four presents the ideas of hypocrisy, prejudice and dignity. In Maycomb, the town in which Harper Lee's book 'To Kill a Mockingbird' is set, hypocrisy and prejudice are prevalent in most of its citizens. Although many of the characters morals are admirable, you soon realise that what people say and what people do are not always related. Mrs Grace Merriweather falls into this category. She is seen to be 'the most devout lady in Maycomb' and her eyes 'always filled with tears when she considered the oppressed' yet she is just as prejudiced to the black citizens or 'darky's' as the majority of the ladies of the 'Maycomb Alabama Methodist Episcopal Church South' are. Mrs Merriweather appears to be the most hypocritical character in this chapter. ...read more.

Middle

This shows us a lot about Miss Maudie's character. She, like Atticus tries to be the 'same on the street as she is at home. The changes in Aunt Alexandra are obvious in this chapter, we see this from the way she reacts to Atticus' news. When Atticus tells Aunt Alexandra of the news Tom Robinson has died, she is genuinely upset - 'Aunt Alexandra put her hands to her face.' This is unlike the Aunt Alexandra we had seen before In Maycomb, the town in which Harper Lee's book 'To Kill a Mockingbird' is set, hypocrisy and prejudice are prevalent in most of its citizens. Although many of the characters morals are admirable, you soon realise that what people say and what people do are not always related. ...read more.

Conclusion

Scout does not realise, but Miss Maudie and Aunt Alexandra do. Although this chapter shows us how Aunt Alexandra is slowly changing, she does not say anything because she is a 'Fine Folk.' Miss Maudie, on the other hand, says to Mrs Merriweather 'His food doesn't stick going down, does it?' This shows us a lot about Miss Maudie's character. She, like Atticus tries to be the 'same on the street as she is at home. The changes in Aunt Alexandra are obvious in this chapter, we see this from the way she reacts to Atticus' news. When Atticus tells Aunt Alexandra of the news Tom Robinson has died, she is genuinely upset - 'Aunt Alexandra put her hands to her face.' This is unlike the Aunt Alexandra we had seen before. Therefore I conclude that Harper Lee's use of language makes the story work. ...read more.

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