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To what extent do the Sherlock Holmes stories you've studied typify the genre of Detective Fiction?

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Introduction

We have red and studied five of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and throughout the next few pages I will be discussing if his stories are typical or not in Detective Fiction. In Detective Fiction it doesn't matter how much difference the plots are, it is basically the same story, every story in Detective Fiction contains a wise and noble detective with a less intelligent sidekick or apprentice (amanuensis), who is after a villain or murderer who is out for revenge or greed, finding clues until finally leading up to the normally surprising Denouement, where the detective rounds up the clues they have found and explains who did it and how in the gripping story finale. Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes first appeared in a local newspaper in the late 1880s and was a series of short stories narrated by Holmes' friend and companion Dr John H. Watson (named just Watson in the stories) until becoming a series of novels in the early 1890s, and finishing with "The Final Problem" and Holmes' death in 1927. Since then the Sherlock Holmes novels have inspired and amazed readers from all across the world and created the newly formed fiction we all know today, But is Conan Doyle's fiction typical in what we class as Detective Fiction? In any story in Detective Fiction the setting is always important, if the setting wasn't in common with the villain or the crime it lowers the overall story, for example if the story was set in a sunny and happy country home ...read more.

Middle

"Let me introduce you" he shouted "to Mr Neville St Clair, of Lee, in the county of Kent."" The other story being "The Red Headed League" where Holmes and Watson were on the hunt for finding the mysterious Duncan Ross, who had formed the Red-Headed League, who disappeared a few weeks after Jabez Wilson had spent his days there writing encyclopaedias, in the end turning out that Ross was digging a tunnel from Wilson's shop and , disguised as John Clay , broke into the bank but was caught by Holmes "Sherlock Holmes had sprung out and seized the intruder by the collar" ""It's no use John Clay," said Holmes blandly; "you have no chance at all"". I think the Detective Fiction writers use themes like deceit or greed because it connects to everybody in the worlds life because we all lie to our friends or family, or we can relate to greed because we all use it one time or another in life. To sum up the themes that you can notice in Conan Doyle's stories can be classed as nothing above what we all see and know in the Detective Genre, and Conan Doyle doesn't use the themes to make Sherlock Holmes stand out from what we read today but instead uses it to connect to the roots of detective fiction. In the Detective Genre the characters are one of the most important things, if the character is unique and stands out so will the story. ...read more.

Conclusion

"The Speckled Band" when he says "No, but I observe the second half of a return ticket in the palm of your left glove" which, as any other detective, he uses in his conclusion of her journey here. "You must have started early, and yet you had a good drive in a dog-cart, along heavy roads, before you arrived at the station." From this you can tell the overall intelligence Conan Doyle had whist writing his stories and the mind he had progressed onto Holmes and the stories really show how wise he is, and this, in most ways this makes him stand out even more than the other theories I have that separate him from the Detective Genre. In conclusion to the paragraphs, the Sherlock Holmes stories to typify the Detective Genre, but it is the fact that Conan Doyle had a mind far greater than the other detective writers, he dared to go beyond than any other detective writer did and disobey the commandments of a Detective Genre story, because of this the Sherlock Holmes novels were made more powerful whether due to the descriptive settings, the original but far fetched characters, even its completely powerful narrative, they all are the reasons why the stories Conan Doyle wrote are classed far beyond the average story in any genre and placed in the worlds most loved novels of all times. ?? ?? ?? ?? To what extent do the Sherlock Holmes stories you've studied typify the genre of Detective Fiction? 1 By Matthew Lomax ...read more.

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