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To what extent is Act III Scene ii an important turningpoint in 'Hamlet'? How does Zefferelli create dramatic tensionin his interpretation?

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Introduction

To what extent is Act III Scene ii an important turning point in 'Hamlet'? How does Zefferelli create dramatic tension in his interpretation? 'Hamlet' is considered to be one of Shakespeare's most famous plays and is a play of questions. Unresolved questions are constantly being asked, such as the ghost's intentions, good or evil. The most important question in the play in whether Hamlet is really mad, or is he acting. Hamlet is constantly seeking the truth to these questions. In this essay I am not only going to focus on the original text by Shakespeare, but will also be focusing on Franco Zefferelli's film production of 'Hamlet'. Zefferelli's 129 minute film contains only 31% of the lines. In addition, Zefferelli also rearranges and rewrites. Leading up to Act III Scene ii, Hamlet is very upset about the death of his father, and we can see this as in Act I Scene ii Hamlet is the only person dressed in black which shows that he is the only one that is still mourning over his father's death. ...read more.

Middle

The ghost is also the result of the 'play within a play' in Act III Scene ii. This is because Hamlet feels that he needs to prove if the ghost was telling the truth before he goes and kills his uncle, Claudius. The is one of the main questions posed in 'Hamlet', and Act III Scene ii is a major turning point in the play. After Hamlet has spoken to the ghost, he says that he is going to pretend that he is mad, and he tells Horatio and Marcellus this, which once again shows that he trusts Horatio, but that he also trusts Marcellus, which is important later on in the play. The consequences of Hamlet seeking revenge are very severe as when he knows that the ghost was telling the truth and after he has set out to seek revenge, there are a great many deaths in the play, which are all a result of Hamlet seeking revenge. Before this however is Hamlet's feigned madness. All of the characters (with the exception of Claudius) ...read more.

Conclusion

Hamlet: Nothing." - p89 There is also a relationship change between Hamlet & Gertrude, as when Gertrude tells Hamlet to go sit next to him, he says no and goes to sit with Ophelia. "Gertrude: Come hither my good Hamlet, sit by me. Hamlet: No, good mother, here's metal more attractive." - p89 Also in this scene we see that Claudius does not react well to the play of the murder. This shows us that Claudius has a very guilty conscience as a result of the murder, and during this scene he shows this by acting very peculiarly during the play. He also realizes that Hamlet may know about the murder and so he starts to panic. This shows to Hamlet that the ghost was telling Hamlet about the murder of his father, and as a result of this the theme of revenge develops from this point onwards. Now I will explore the ways in which Franco Zefferelli creates dramatic tension in his film interpretation of Act III Scene ii. Franco Zefferelli's film interpretation creates dramatic tension using a number of different techniques. Hamlet Coursework Thomas Hostler 10V ...read more.

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