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Who is the monster - Frankenstein or his creation?

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Introduction

Who is the monster - Frankenstein or his creation? "Frankenstein" written by Mary Shelly, was first published in 1818. The book has sold millions of copies and has become deeply rooted in today's society by films and other versions of the books. The main bulk of the story is about Victor Frankenstein's horrendous adventure. However there are sub-plots throughout the story, Robert Walton's journey to the North Pole, and the time the monster spends with the DeLacy family. The definition of a monster is, "something of unusual size or appearance, a huge terrifying creature or an evil person." [Chambers School Dictionary] All of these definitions can be related to both Frankenstein and the creation. To the creation, a huge terrifying creature and of unusual size and appearance, and to Frankenstein an evil person, powered by his hatred of the monster. Mary Shelly's life was very similar to the story of "Frankenstein". Her child, also called William, died at a young age. Her mother died at childbirth and possibly gave the sense of abandonment felt by the creation, "My person was hideous and my stature gigantic. ...read more.

Middle

This was preceded by Victor's first encounter with the creation, after he had brought him to life. The idea that mankind was clearly linked to nature was a common Romantic principle Victor also saw himself as a god-like figure. This could be related to the Prometheus myth, modelling man after his own fashion. Throughout the story he reverts to himself as a very powerful person. It could also relate to the second Prometheus myth, in which he took fire from the God's and gave it to man, much in the same way that Victor took life and give it to the creation. The story itself has a story inside a story, a Chinese box, with a story on the outside, (Robert Walton's journey to the North Pole) then a story inside that, (Victor's experience with the monster) and the monster in the middle (The monster's time with the DeLacy family). Victor retells how he met the monster on the mountain, which took him to a hut and told him about his time with the DeLaceys. This story gives us a new look at the monster. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion Frankenstein seems to be more of a monster than the creation. The monster gave many opportunities to be accepted into normal life, but every time he tried he was shot, beaten and been sent away. Frankenstein on the other hand, took no effort to help the monster, and he truly hated the monster on his appearance alone. Frankenstein also began to create a second monster, the bride for the creation. However half way through Frankenstein destroyed the corpse and thus angered the monster further, when Frankenstein could have had the monster out of his life for all eternity. This is also a good example of Frankenstein's selfishness as it shows that he was only thinking about himself as he believes that the creation well use this second monster to reek havoc upon the world, "Three years before, I was engaged in the same manner and created a fiend whose unparalleled barbarity [Once again we see that he is being biased towards the monster as he never tried to reason with the monster and any time.] had desolated my heart and filled it forever with the bitterest remorse. I was now to form another being of whose dispositions I was alike ignorant; she might become ten thousand times more malignant that her mate..." ...read more.

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