• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Who or what is responsible for Scrooge's change of character in 'A Christmas Carol'?

Extracts from this document...


Transfer-Encoding: chunked Who or what is responsible for Scrooge's change of character in 'A Christmas Carol'? ?A Christmas carol? written by the Unitarian and well respected Charles Dickens narrates the novella of the dark and exploitative nature of man whom embodies the story's main character, Ebenezer Scrooge, renowned as a cantankerous and callous Industrialist of the Victorian era. He exercises his parsimonious, gluttonous ways on Christmas Eve and intentionally refuses Christmas festivity. Indeed, A Christmas Carol is a severe and scathing diatribe on the social conditions of the time and the nature of man that exploits those conditions. Dickens therefore employs the four ghosts as a necessary measure to redeem the compassionate full humanity, and restore harmony to society. Christmas is seen as the best season to revolve this revolution, as it is the time Christ was born, which is symbolic of new life, and therefore a restoration or ?rebirth? of Scrooge. This is done over a series of ghosts, each fundamental to reconnecting the time synapses of Scrooge?s life, and therefore allowing his redemption. Dickens uses onomatopoeia to describe Marley's dramatic entrance, "The cellar-door flew open with a booming sound." ...read more.


This therefore reinforces the idea that he was afraid of being vulnerable. The Cratchits are all appreciative for what they have, even though it is not much at all, 'feebly cried Hurrah' shows their gratefulness. The word ?feebly? is a connotation for inadequate, representing the unsubstantial food they survive off. Despite this, they cheer ?Hurrah?, portraying how they are grateful for still being a family ? this was a luxury, as many families were separated as a result of the Poor Laws, which only offered the workhouses, a horrible institution for people convicted for being in debt. 'Nobody said or thought it was at all a small pudding for a large family' tells us that they understand what situation they are in and do not question it. The word ?small? also references not only the inadequate portions, but also is used to reference there insignificance in society, as the rock bottom of the social hierarchy. This is also demonstrated by the name ?Tiny Tim? which shows the insignificance he possesses. The fact Scrooge can save him, and has always ignored the family?s desperation also reinforces this. However, Scrooge wants reassurance that Tiny Tim will definitely live, 'tell me if Tiny Tim will live? after seeing the family?s dire need for help, and their situation. ...read more.


This phrase could suggest Scrooges lack of physiological understanding of the value of life, and his distorted mind set ?too dark to be observed?. In conclusion, the book is clearly a social commentary, as demonstrated to have been written to reflect the autobiographical experience and suffering of the author with the intent of suggesting to readers the need to reform the social system which had sprung up around them. The association with Christmas is ironic in that people have come to think of A Christmas Carol as a story about the Christmas spirit when it really embodies a tale of the universal human spirit which needs to be recovered, and which the protagonist Scrooge, the embodiment of the ills of contemporary society of Dickens, recovered through the character catharsis concluding the character arc driving the action of the story thereof. The most affective Ghost in my opinion was the Ghost of Christmas Past, as it catalysed the initial road to redemption for Scrooge, as by the end of the three phantoms, he had already shown change in character. The Ghost of Christmas Past makes him relive the errors and shame of his youth, and causes him to regret the way he treated his true love, which built the fundamental foundation for his quick revolution and his motivation to change his ways. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE A Christmas Carol section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE A Christmas Carol essays

  1. A Christmas Carol - Marley's Ghost.

    his head, as if it were too warm to wear indoors, its lower jaw dropped down upon its breast! Scrooge fell upon his knees, and clasped his hands before his face. 'Mercy!' he said. 'Dreadful apparition, why do you trouble me?'

  2. The novel 'A Christmas Carol', by Charles

    In the novel money represents lack of human compassion. Belle says 'another idol has displaced me' when she leaves Scrooge as she notices his change towards her due to loving money more. In the novel it shows that being wealthy or poor does not make a difference in people's happiness.

  1. How does Scrooges character transform through his meetings with the ghosts in a Christmas ...

    The first thing he said to the spirit of present was 'is there a peculiar flavour in what you sprinkle from your torch.' Scrooge had never seen this before and was shocked because how good it really is. Ebenezer had never seen people playing Christmas songs on the streets or shops that weren't even open.

  2. Show how Dickens presents the change in Scrooge's view of life and death. Look ...

    Marley had changed Scrooge into a greedy, money grabbing man. Marley was whom Scrooge wanted to be like everyone to do as he wanted and all the money rolling in. Marley believes it was his fault how Scrooge had now become, he came back to haunt Scrooge and give him his message as it was important to do so.

  1. Christmas Carol Ebenezer Scrooge is a tightfisted miser who has only one purpose in ...

    "Scrooge...saw in the knocker...not a knocker, but Marley's face." Bad omens breed ill times to come, and this was most definitely a bad omen. "As Scrooge looked fixedly at this phenomenon, it was a knocker again." This was the beginning of a very long night in which he was visited firstly by the 'Ghost of Marley'.

  2. With reference to the themes of wealth and poverty, what lessons do you think ...

    His solitude is heightened through the line, 'One Christmas time, when yonder solitary child was left here all alone, he did come, for the first time, just like that. Poor boy.' He is talking about himself here in the third person emphasising to the reader his feelings of loneliness at this time and how they shaped him later in life.

  1. Dickens is trying to change Victorian society. How does he use the ghosts to ...

    We first come across Ebenezer Scrooge near the beginning of Stave I, after we are firmly assured that Scrooge's old business partner Jacob Marley is "Dead as a doornail." Dickens begins the story this way to grasp the reader's attention, as it brings all sorts of questions to mind, for

  2. How does Dickens use language and Imagery to show that Scrooge's desire for wealth ...

    And this is, in my opinion, one of the reasons the book is so convincing. The inclusion of the ghosts in 'A Christmas Carol' act as a reminder of the general crimes against humanity Scrooge commits, in other words, the ghosts act as Scrooge's conscience.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work