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Write a Letter to an Aspiring Witter giving advice on writing a Gothic Novel using Frankenstein as an Example?

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Introduction

John Doe 1 Salisbury Place Weybridge Surrey KT14 6SW 16th April 2009 Dear John Thank you for your inquiry into the aspects of a Gothic novel, and I hope to aid you and I gather that advise you using the book Frankenstein written by Mary Shelley. More specifically I will look at Chapter 5 of Frankenstein and I have no doubt it will be of assistance. I aim to address is the criteria of a Gothic novel, while using Chapter 5 of Frankenstein to expand upon it. "Frankenstein" is a good example of a Gothic novel. Written in 1816, by Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein" has become one of the most widely known examples of Gothic literature novels to date. It uses much of the issues around society at that time, dealing with scientific elements as well as more subtle components recounting to philosophical ideas such as nature vs. nurture. I will use chapter 5 more specifically, as it continues many of the elements which you require to create you novel which I will now go into greater detail into, with it being one of the most integral parts of the book. ...read more.

Middle

on some of the ethical issues of her time, mainly advancements in science and issues such as bring life back to "inanimate" tissues. It symbolises for her the fact that science could be taken to extremes, and the events after indicate this. These events are often preceded by a vision. You may want to use this before some form of death. In chapter 5 there are no real disturbing dream visions, a better example can be seen in other gothic novels, and I will used The Castle of Otranto, this includes the omen that "That the castle and lordship of Otranto should pass from the present family, whenever the real owner should be grown too large to inhabit it." or any phenomenon that may be seen as a portent of coming events other than in some way or Victor's dream of Elizabeth death., an omen that it is soon to be his time to die while at every turn the women are put into distress and a epitomising the feel that all will happen in an almost omnipotent fashion will come to its end. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally I would sat that in order for you book to match that of Shelley's you may want to include some issues surrounding ethical issues at the time, and as an example think of the issues surrounding the other title of Shelley's novel being "The Modern Prometheus" this in the case of Frankenstein is the issues surrounding playing god. This brought about by greater scientific and medical advances in her time. You may use this to make your story to bring about a deeper meaning than that just of a ghost story. To conclude, I hope that the guidelines that I have provided will help you succeed in you overall goal of creating a true gothic novel. This can be easily achieved by following the simple process of metonymy of gloom, tragic females, tyrannical males, supernatural events, overwrought emotion and an ominous dream. It may seem like a daunting task however I will always offer more support and advice if you feel that you need it and I hope to read your novel and give my opinion on it, which I am sure will be great. Yours Sincerely Dr M. Yellehs ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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