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Wuthering Heights - summary

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Introduction

Wuthering Heights After it's publication in 1847 this novel made an immediate impression on its readers. It aroused mixed feelings and continues to do so even today. As this novel was very ground breaking, readers were shocked and some did not react well to this book. However, it is clearly recognised as a classic novel. The author of this book, although well known in the present, was unheard of in 1847, and Emily Bronte was forced to enter a male name, as woman authors were unheard of in the 19th century. Her book would not have been published otherwise. Emily Bronte was born in 1818 at Thornton, a bleak moorland village near Bradford in Yorkshire. She was the fourth daughter of an Irish clergyman. The family of six children lived in privacy and since Mr Bronte was busy with his work as a vicar and their mother was ill with cancer, the children became very close and dependent on each other. Although living in solitude, Mr Bronte was up to date with the goings on in the world and this was maybe where Emily Bronte got her ideas. Emily liked to wander the moors in her free time as well as writing, where her imagination would run wild. ...read more.

Middle

"How very dark and grim you look," says Cathy. She does not mean to be cruel but she is na�ve and does not know that she is hurting him. Hindley thoroughly enjoys humiliating Heathcliff in front of Cathy. Heathcliff is shown up as he stands in the presence of the beautiful lady Cathy. Cathy's love for Heathcliff has not changed, however she begins to express it very differently. Isabella and Edgar come round for Christmas dinner and Cathy dresses up for their arrival. This is the first sign of Cathy falling for Edgar. It is noticeable that she acts differently around them. Heathcliff is determined to look his best for Cathy. Bronte is showing Heathcliff's love for Cathy yet again. The smartly dressed Heathcliff is banished from the table by Hindley before supper begins. "Begone you vagabond", quotes Hindley. This shows Hindley's determination to separate Cathy and Heathcliff forever. Heathcliff is again humiliated, this time by Edgar. "I wonder if the locks make his head ache". Heathcliff can take no more and Emily Bronte shows Heathcliff's violent nature when he pours hot sauce over Edgar Linton. Heathcliff's evil side comes out when he swears revenge on Hindley. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Cathy dies we again see how the two men are completely different yet linked in their love for Cathy. I believe that both men are as distraught as each over the death of Cathy, however they express this very differently. Edgar's heart is broken and says nothing just sitting in the corner crying over his wife. Heathcliff on the other hand is raging. He cannot accept the fact that she is gone. "I cannot live without my soul" Heathcliff exclaims. He becomes obsessed, digging up Cathy's grave and replacing Cathy's picture of Edgar in her locket with his own picture. Isabella cannot take his mood swings she is beaten more than ever after Cathy's death and eventually runs away. Edgar and Heathcliff are two completely different people both physically and mentally. They are from completely different backgrounds. Edgar was spoilt as a child and lived in a big house with many servants. Compare this to Heathcliffs background; he lived on the streets of Liverpool taking what food he could from bins. However they are linked by one thing and one thing only Cathy! Their love for Cathy even surpasses their growing hatred of one another. Emily Bronte shows us this only when Edgar realises that Cathy belongs on the moors and is buried there instead of in the Linton family vault. David Macfarlane ...read more.

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