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Wuthering Heights - What does Emily Bronte convey about Heathcliff in each of the extracts?

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Introduction

ENGLISH COURSEWORK (PART ONE) WUTHERING HEIGHTS COMPARISON OF TWO EXTRACTS What does Emily Bronte convey about Heathcliff in each? I am going to compare two different extracts from the book Wuthering Heights written by Emily Bronte. I will compare the language and the structure of the different extracts. Extract one is when Heathcliff has just been brought to the house. Mr Earnshaw has returned with Heathcliff after a trip to Liverpool. Extract 2 is the part of the book when Nelly's been lured up to Wuthering heights by Heathcliff. This is also the part of the book when Heathcliff is exacting his revenge on people, then Nelly and Heathcliff begin to talk about his treatment of Hareton. The way Emily Bronte conveys Heathcliff in the two extracts is very different, in one extract Heathcliff is conveyed as an object whereas in the other extract he's conveyed as a mean monster. In extract 1 Emily Bronte puts across that Heathcliff is picked on and doesn't seem wanted by the family. The most frequent example of this is when Heathcliff is called 'it'. This is sort of evocative language because 'it' triggers an emotional reaction towards Heathcliff, making us sympathise with him. ...read more.

Middle

Hareton, Hindley's son, has taken Heathcliff's role as the rough-mannered and scruffy one. A quote that illustrates this is "I've got him faster than his scoundrel of a father secured me, and lower, for he takes pride in his brutishness". This means that Hareton was better off than Heathcliff was at a similar age, but unlike Heathcliff, Hareton took pride in being rough and ignorant. We see that Heathcliff really has become a monster because Heathcliff takes pleasure in making Hareton as he was, but Heathcliff also wasn't embarrassed to admit it, as we can tell when he began "reflecting aloud" to Nelly, not trying to hide what he was doing. But the best thing about it Heathcliff says is that "hareton is damnably fond of me! You'll own that I've out matched hindley there". This quote tells us two things: one that Hareton is very fond of Heathcliff and two, that Nelly can't deny that Heathcliff has beaten Hindley. This signifies that Heathcliff's out-matched Hindley because Hareton likes his master (Heathcliff), whilst Heathcliff didn't like Hindley who was his master. So here we see that Heathcliff seems to be comparing him-self to Hindley, as if it were a competition. ...read more.

Conclusion

In extract one there is a lot tension, especially in the first two paragraphs. This tension is achieved in these paragraphs by the use of commas, and we don't discover that Mr Earnshaw has brought Heathcliff back from Liverpool until the third paragraph; the commas make you read the paragraphs slower, therefore adding extra tension. Extract 2 is quite different. It seems more open and less tense. By open I mean freer flowing. This makes the extract less tense and more descriptive than extract one. It may seem more open because of the long, complex sentences used in the extract. The fact that it is mainly dialogue may explain why it is more open than extract one, which is narrated by Nelly Dean. So it is obvious from the two extracts that for some reason Heathcliff has changed during the course of the book, in extract 1 Heathcliff is the one who is being picked on by the family, while in the second extract it is Heathcliff who is picking on the family. This is conveyed in many ways during the two extracts: by the sentence length, structure, and type; also by the amount of dialogue, and even by the language used by Emily Bronte in the extracts. Ashley Akerman, 09/05/07 1 English Coursework (Part One)-Comparison of 2 extracts from W.H ...read more.

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