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How can one apply JeanPiaget's theory of cognitive development in developing children's literacysk

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Introduction

How can one apply Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development in developing children's literacy skills? Jean Piaget: Jean Piaget, was one of the most influential researchers in the area of developmental psychology. Piaget originally trained in the areas of zoology and psychiatry. He believed that what distinguishes human beings from other animals is our ability to do "abstract symbolic reasoning." And our ability to think and make decisions intelligently He believed, "Intelligence is defined as individual's ability to adapt to and cope with what ever environment the individual lives in". Piaget became interested in how children think. He noticed that young children's answers were qualitatively different than older children, which suggested to him that the younger ones were not dumber (a quantitative position since as they got older and experienced they would get smarter) but, instead, answered the questions differently than their older peers because they thought differently. Their thoughts have not yet been affected and polluted by the environment. He said, "The human metal growth (or cognitive development) is the inevitable out come of the infant's interaction with the physical world". His view of how children's minds work and develop has been enormously influential, particularly in educational theory. While growing up the children's capacity to understand their world is increased. ...read more.

Middle

the child will search for something he hasn't seem hidden. The child knows that when "I" close my eyes I can't see mommy and when "she" closes her eyes she can't see me. o (18-24 months) The baby is now able to mentally represent himself. He is able to invent his own play activity and play becomes the most important learning realm. With his toys, he uses symbolic representation to transform objects. Cognition at this stage moves beyond mere sensory motor towards preconception thought and the genesis of early language, transforming cognitive activity. Here, the youngster is constructing and recording experiences from a language framework, rather than an action base. Pre-operational stage: (2-6 years) The preoperational child is much more capable of understanding his world but markedly different to adults in terms of efficiency. Preconception thinking: o (2-4 years) This stage is characterized by a lack of ability to classify and regards similar objects as though they are identical in a type of muddled categorization; I.e. all men must be 'Daddy', all animals are 'doggies', all toys are his, one pile of green beads has more than another pile of non-green beads. The pre concepts child cannot discriminate between oranges and apples for instance but has a hunger to constantly ask 'what is that?' ...read more.

Conclusion

o Gains ability to influence responses of others and hence better controls the various types of social input. 1. Continue to give students a chance to manipulate objects and test out their ideas. 2. Make sure that lectures and readings are brief and well organized. 3. Ask students to deal with no more than three or four variables at a time. 4. Use familiar examples to help explain more complex ideas so students will have a beginning point for assimilating new information. 5. Give opportunities to classify and group objects and ideas on increasingly complex levels. 6. Present problems which require logical, analytical thinking to solve. Sheema Sheikh Page 3 10/11/2004 Stage of formal Operations: (11/12- Adulthood) o This stage is characterized by abstract and logical thinking, complex verbal and problem-solving abilities as well as hypothesis formation. o Creates his own theory of knowledge. Adolescent is now able to sift through a knowledge field in a process of combinational analysis. o Can draw meaningful conclusion from purely abstract terms. (Never been to the moon but he can write about it.) Thinking is no longer limited to reality or personal experience. 1. Continue to use many of the teaching strategies and materials appropriate for students at the concrete operational stage. 2. Give students an opportunity to explore many hypothetical questions. 3. Encourage students to explain how they solve problems. 4. Whenever possible, teach broad concepts, not just facts, using materials and ideas relevant to the students. Sheema Sheikh Page 4 10/11/2004 ...read more.

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