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Black civil rights

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Introduction

History GCSE Coursework American Civil rights Black African Americans have been treated inadequately by the opposite race (white people) for centuries from when the slave trade was in full force to the contemporary day with gang violence and racism in all fifty states of the USA. I am going investigate the reasons why black Americans argued for their civil rights and what successes were brought about by this fighting in the 1950s and 1960s. Some evidence of racism to Black people in the USA was written in a black journalist's book quoted from 'American Dreams lost and found'. It shows no respect, and gives a sense of inferiority, illustrating white attitudes to blacks in the early to mid 20th century. It draws a powerful image of blacks being fit for menial jobs and be deficient in the ability to do professional jobs. One problem leading to Blacks fighting for their Civil Rights was the unjust Jim Crow rules in the Southern states. The white people who lived in the South wanted to maintain a two tier society. In 1880 they introduced legal segregation of races. This was a concept of Blacks being separate from Whites but the two societies being equal. There would be separate facilities for blacks and whites from hotels to schools. Inter race marriage was made illegal by these laws. This was all to keep a defined two tier society. An additional reason why Blacks fought for their Civil Rights was the voting rights which they had. There were voting qualification laws. Blacks had to pass a literacy test which was incredibly hard because they were uneducated. ...read more.

Middle

To set things in motion I would like to begin with talking about the successes achieved in America. When segregation was coming to its closing stages, the Brown decision of 1954 made it illegal to have segregated schools. This was not very popular for white people of the South of America. Many white coloured communities often resisted, like in Little Rock Arkansas. One case that is known as the 'Brown Case', involved a little girl called Louise Brown, whose parents wanted her to go to an all-white school. This little girl was black. Her parents fought for their rights to send their girl to that school. They thought segregation was over. According to white people it was not. At Little Rock in the state of Arkansas, federal troops had to force their way into a white school so that black people could go there. Another case was that from the Modern America book about James Meredith. He had the qualifications to go to the University of Mississippi, after taking the school to court several times he had a place on a course in 1962. When James came to the University for registration the governor of Mississippi was barricading the way in. It took the US army to stop the governor from stopping James from going to the university. Rioters rioted and protesters protested until he could attend all his classes. In the end he had several federal marshals to protect him at school. These two reports show the real hatred of the Blacks by the Whites of Southern America, but the point is Blacks stepped forward in education and gained very equal opportunities of a decent education to whites; Which Blacks did not have when segregation was around. ...read more.

Conclusion

The rescue missions even were holding victims at gunpoint, the Blacks where also seen as criminals and looters. Blacks still had to fight to improve the conditions of black people in the USA. The Civil Rights Acts were not enough. They were seriously hard to enforce. The wealth and big businesses were still owned by whites. Banks refused to lend money to people in 'Black' areas. This resulted in a succession of riots in cities across America. A system was then introduced were companies had to appoint a certain proportion of Blacks, or other disadvantaged groups. Even less educated less qualified than other applicants. This was a slight set back to what Blacks expected Blacks wanted an even spread of rich whites and Blacks not still having a vast amount of whites being richer. In conclusion I believe that all the successes for Blacks were a big step forward for Blacks in the 1950s and 60s. Fighting for their country in Europe to following Martin Luther King through Washington; Blacks struggled and fought for their Civil Rights and won. However they also had great loses. Like the racism continuing right up to this day. Their social status plummets and their economic power always being under par. But they still to this day stride towards a better future, with the help of peaceful Blacks like Martin Luther King as inspiration to make a name for themselves in the USA. The result of their successes a better world were a young make in America can learn at a good education standard, a young Black can work as whatever they want to be, and most importantly a Black man can be considered an equal to a white man in America. ?? ?? ?? ?? History Coursework 1 ...read more.

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