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History - The Effects of evacuation in world war 2 Section 3 & 4

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Introduction

Section 3: (The Experience of Host Families in World War II) The experience of the host families in World War 2 is similar to that of the evacuees. There are many different experiences. Some of them good, and again some of them bad. In World War II, millions of children were evacuated into the surrounding countryside of Great Britain. Whether they liked it or not, millions of families would have to look after a child, maybe more throughout the war. Some children had to be foistered onto people. Others were accepted without question. Some host families were even paid to look after these children. As quoted in source 13; "For unaccompanied children getting full board and lodging: 10 shillings and sixpence [52p] per week for one child, 8 shillings and sixpence [42p] per week for each additional child". ...read more.

Middle

I am also assuming that it is a primary source. The next source I have chosen is Source 15. It is a secondary source published in the 'Reader's Digest magazine' in 1993. It is an article written about what life was like on the 'Home Front' in World War II. It is a bad source, because it contains many bad points such as "Complaints of thieving, swearing, bed-wetting and general 'smelliness' were made time and time again against the 'townie' children." As quoted from source 15. This shows that many children who were evacuated were causing havoc in the countryside and their temporal homes. This source could have been exaggerated and/or edited before it was published because at the time of its publish it was roughly fifty years after the war and the Reader's Digest are an entertainment magazine, not a war magazine. The next source I have chosen is Source 17. ...read more.

Conclusion

The process went underway just prior to the start of World War II in September 1939. As the evacuees arrived in the rural villages and towns of Great Britain, many people who lived there exposed their doubts and concerns that the 'outsider' city children would not be able to cope with life in the countryside and the host families that would take them in. At first the predictions made by the villagers and townsman were a reality. But soon after, the evacuees quickly began to change and accept the country lifestyle and developed a more mature way of living. And so, the doubts and concerns expressed were forgotten. When the war and the VE day celebrations were over, many evacuees and families everywhere found it hard to get back to their previous lives after 6 years of struggling. Many children did not want to return to their city lifestyles, and never left their host families and became adopted. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sam Johnson History ...read more.

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