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how did aerial bombardment affect people of england and wales

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Introduction

Essay: How Did Aerial Bombardment Affect the People of England & Wales? Source B4 is written by Norman Lowe, and it tells us about the effect of the blitz on England & Wales. It tells us that 60,000 people were killed and around 100,000 injured. Morale was remarkably high and American journalists were shocked at how calm people were and how they tried to carry on as normal. This source is quite reliable as it was written by a historian and he would have researched a lot in newspapers, intelligence reports, diaries etc. He would've used these from the time so they should have been pretty reliable so this is a trustworthy source. But it was from a general book. It tells us that London was bombed. Source B5 is an intelligence report written by intelligence officers. It tells us that the government were concerned that people were turning against the war. It tells us also how Coventry city centre was bombed and almost completely destroyed and almost half the population left every night. ...read more.

Middle

They also had no sense of hygiene. It also tells us how Britain was not united by the war; middle and working-class were still separated with the working class often taking in the poor. This source is reliable as he is reliable as he is a historian and would have done lots of research, such as looking at intelligence reports and newspaper articles from this time, newspapers are good, because they give us knowledge from the time, but the knowledge in intelligence reports is better. Source B2 is a government intelligence report that also tells us about the blitz on evacuees. This source mostly agrees with source B1 as it suggests Britain was not united and states the dirty habits of evacuees. It is a reliable source as it was written by an intelligence officer who was basically a spy and would have known the truth, such as poor hygiene. Source B3 agrees with both sources B1 + B2 it is a photograph of evacuee children waiting to be put with a family. ...read more.

Conclusion

It also tells us that Britain got alot of food from America. It tells us how rationing was introduced first on sugar and butter, and then extended until almost all basic food was brought using ration coupons. It also tells us how women were expected to grow their own food, which suggests that there was a shortage. Source D2 is 2 propaganda posters encouraging British people to grow their own vegetables and "dig for victory". In D1 there is a paragraph that says rationing was fair, balanced and brilliantly organised by Lord Woolton. Source D3 is called inequality and sacrifice which disagrees with D2 as it says it is fair. The source is an extract from a home intelligence report, and it tells us how people that were rich were treated better and used to go out to eat all the time. We can also learn that not everyone got the same. Things such as salmon were not rationed. D1 suggests that rationing was fair, but D3 disagrees. The people of Britain weren't united by the war. Ami Gregory ...read more.

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