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How Successful was the New Deal - Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected as President of the United States in 1932.

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Introduction

How Successful was the New Deal Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected as President of the United States in 1932. At this time America was in the grip of the Depression. He set out his priorities and they were getting Americans back to work, protecting their savings and property, providing relief for the old, sick and unemployed, and getting the American industry and farming back on their feet. Roosevelt immediately began to tackle the problems of the Depression and he passed many laws in the first hundred days of his presidency. This was the New Deal. For example, to help the unemployed he created jobs paid for by the Government. He set up certain agencies to tackle the unemployment such as the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps), which aimed at helping particularly young men. They would get help for six months and if they didn't get help getting a job then they could sign on for another period of six months. ...read more.

Middle

Many had not enjoyed the prosperity of the 1920's. The AAA (Agricultural Adjustment Administration), looked at the long-term problems facing farmers. They set quotas to increase the price of farm produce by gradually reduce the production. It also taught the farmers a new and modern way of farming that would save and conserve the soil at the same time. The AAA also gave help on farmer's mortgages if the case had become to extreme and caused more hardship. The only problem was that a lot of farm labourers were put out of work because of the new modernisation method the farmers had been taught. These early actions of the Government were successful in dealing with the emergency Depression and people became more confident. Some people such as wealthy business people disagreed with Roosevelt, but he continued with the second New Deal policies. He tried to make employers pay fair wages and in 1935 passed the Social Security Act. ...read more.

Conclusion

The poorest people in America often didn't get help during these years of benefit, and stayed as poor as they were, but also many were helped thanks to the HOLC. In conclusion the New Deal was a great success, as Franklin D. Roosevelt put his heart and soul into saving America and helping them out of the hole that Herbert Hoover had dug for them. He started the Alphabet Agencies, which didn't just help people but also gave money back to the government. They also helped everyone and not just certain people like the rich or white. The one major problem that it didn't tackle fully was unemployment, but the joining of the Second World War almost stopped that in its tracks. FDR and his men did save America, and whilst doing this became the most popular president in the history of the USA, proven by the fact he stayed in three terms. ...read more.

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