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Stalins' Russia Coursework

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Introduction

Explain Trotsky's contribution to the success of the Bolsheviks in 1922 There are lots of contributions that Leon Trotsky made in 1922 that led to the success of the Bolsheviks. His contributions were not only shown through his actions, but through his encouraging personality as well. These combined helped Russia pull through up to 1922. Most of Trotsky's contributions were through his actions. His first action was that he was elected for, by the public when Lenin went into exile, to be Chairman of the Petrograd Soviet. This helped lead to success as he was put in charge of the capital, and able to gain support for the Bolsheviks because of his high position of influence and control. Trotsky also ran the revolutionary committee, of which the plan to seizure power was created. This action contributed to lead the Bolsheviks to success as the careful planning, organisation and understanding of the nature of the capital, which would be rewarded in the end by success. The third action of Trotsky made significant difference to the success as Trotsky organised and led the November/October revolution. This helped the Bolsheviks as the revolution was successful, and the Bolsheviks took control of Petrograd, meaning, with control of the capital, the Bolsheviks ideas and policies could be spread over Russia. The last, but not least, was Trotsky's forming of the red army to fight in the civil war. By doing this, and recruiting huge numbers of men, they were able to fight and win the civil war, initially leading the Bolshevik group to victory and regaining complete control of Russia. ...read more.

Middle

This linked in with Stalin being a very suspicious man, and was suspicious of all his colleagues and everyone who surrounded him. This also made sure he didn't give one person too much power. When the time came, Stalin was able to unite with rivals to force the ultimate threat out, Trotsky. If not for Trotsky's weaknesses and disadvantages, he probably would have overthrown Stalin. One of the many factors standing against Trotsky was that he was Jewish, and Russia was an anti-semist country, so he was discriminated for his religion, which made him unpopular among most of the public. Trotsky was also disliked by the opposition leaders, because he was seen as being dynamic and often arrogant, but also because he was Lenin choice to lead, so they were also jealous of Trotsky. After losing support by wanting to persist with war communism, Trotsky was removed from all his positions, and then, finally, the communist party altogether. To make things worst, he suffered the accusation from Stalin of trying to split the communist party, and was therefore sent to exile. The reason why Stalin emerged as Lenin's successor and not Trotsky was mainly to do with Stalin's great determination and power hungry nature which allowed him to carry out the terrible actions he did to eliminate Trotsky from the struggle for power. However, it would not have been so easy for Stalin to do this without the weaknesses that held Trotsky back from gaining control of Russia passed on to him by Lenin. ...read more.

Conclusion

Stalin's economic policies are mainly two points. These are industry and collectivisation. These points were to help develop the modernisation programmes that made him look good, because many people supported the ideas. However, no matter how many people benefited and liked these ideas, some people lost out. Restrictions were imposed upon the workers, which meant long hours and high targets to reach in a short space of time. Passports were needed to pass from one village to the next, and to get the removal of the main opposition at this time (the kulaks) and give them the harsh punishments that were to be inflicted it also meant reduced freedoms. By doing this, Stalin was keeping power by encouraging support by the main majority of people who approved of his plans, as well as raising fear among the population. In conclusion, I think there important main points that helped Stalin keep his grasp over the Soviet Union, but is impossible to say whether they were all equally important, or if some came before others. The things he gained from the events were, firstly, the control of the workers and peasants, which he did so with the economic policies. Secondly, there was the removal of all opposition, which Stalin managed to achieve with the purges and the show trials. Then there was the incitement of fear through the people, and was done so using the secret police, and finally was the action of winning support for Stalin through propaganda and the cult of personality. All of these points were important, but at different times. It was a process that helped Stalin keep control, and extend his time in power over Russia. ...read more.

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