• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why was there a successful revolution in February 1917 in Russia?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why was there a successful revolution in February 1917 in Russia? By 1917, Russia in a state where demonstrations were becoming more frequent each week. Many of these demonstrations happened in Petrograd over food shortages and oppositions grew against the Tsar as this happened. The number of demonstrators rose to nearly of quarter of a million. The Russian people were constantly being let down by the Tsar and the depression grew. The war caused most of these food shortages, as any available food would be taken to soldiers instead of the rest of the population. The strains from the war caused an impact on all societies. The peasants suffered most of the hardships of the war and so became much more radical and revolutionary groups began. Many of the concessions made by Tsar to the middle class societies were still controlled by the Tsar like the Dumas and so the growth political opposition grew. ...read more.

Middle

The low morale continued as the war progressed. Russia was continuing to have high casualties and kept losing supplies and food and the fact that they had no good quality weapons meant that they were not going to be successful in the war. The war caused a shortage of food; this was because any food available would go straight to the soldiers. The war speeded up the process of change- people had soon had enough of the tsar and of what they thought was a pointless war. There was also an economic collapse, which affected all societies after Russia pulled out of the war. The landowners of large estates were hit by a collapse in the value of land. Many industrialists realised that when they failed to secure government orders for war goods, they found themselves disappearing of the markets and many small businesses found themselves bankrupt. The food shortage led the prices of meat and flour rising by 300 per cent. ...read more.

Conclusion

They all had a main focus, or goal. Here on the 23rd, Petrograd was at stand still. The attempts to stop the demonstrators were hinder by the police and army and so the Tsars traditional allies were breaking up even the middle class were against the Tsar. In a way, When the Tsar entered Russia into the war this would be the turning point for the 1917 revolution. This is because the war would cause food shortages and low morale of the army and the Russian people and this would just be the starting of Russia problems. It would also cause hyperinflation and the revolts. But there many other factors to be included like the repression of the tsarist government and the weakness in the economic system. It would seem like that further on Tsarism will not exist anymore in Russia. It could be said that the ultimate defeat of Tsarism was Tsarism. This was because the Tsar's system was too harsh and unfair to peasants. History Essay 1 Shafa Mahmood 04/05/2007 12-VCR ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 essays

  1. How successful were Stalins Economic Policies?

    In some small respects, dekulakisation could be seen to win some support from peasants, because it enabled them to 'settle old scores' with neighbours - they would just accuse the other of being a kulak and they would be taken by the officials and shot or taken to labour camps.

  2. How convincing is the argument that WW1 was the main factor in the collapse ...

    However, this argument seems unconvincing in explaining the collapse of Tsarism. Whilst this incident unavoidably added to the people's distrust of the Tsar, it contributed little to the instability that led to the February revolution. Due to the repressive and domineering nature of the government and increasing distrust in the

  1. Why did the Tsarist regime fall in 1917?

    They both agree that he is not stupid. In source C, it says "Nicholas was not a stupid man", and in source D, it says "He was an extremely reserved man... he was not well educated, but he had some knowledge of human nature".

  2. The fall of Tsarism in Russia.

    The Tsarist government was worried that this might set a precedent for the future, so that the Russian people may use force, disorder or violence to challenge the Tsar. This also indicates that Russia had entered a new era. However with the October Manifesto, the Tsar had acted in bad

  1. How and why did the Bolsheviks seize power in 1917?

    It decided to continue fighting, and asked peasants to wait for elections before taking land. The idea was it would stand down and allow free elections that would fairly and democratically represent the people of Russia. However, the Provisional Government was not the only option for government.

  2. How successful were Stalin's economic policies in the 1920s and 30s?

    Agriculture The changes that were made had two main motives behind them, firstly Stalin's want to bring all of Russia's economy under state control and secondly to increase food production dramatically to feed the massive numbers of workers that Stalin will need to accommodate as a result of his plans for industry.

  1. The blance sheet for russia.

    This cannot be undertaken successfully by a handful of bureaucrats in Moscow, even if they were Marx, Engels, Lenin and Trotsky. Such a state of affairs requires the involvement of the mass of the population in the running of industry and the state.

  2. In this essay I am going to asses the impact that Stalin had on ...

    This was a very controversial decision and it meant the end of the small, individual, old fashioned farms owned by the peasants. In each area, peasants were to pool their fields, their horses and their tools ad work together on a kolkhoz - a collective farm.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work