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WHY WE HAVE LAW

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Introduction

Odette Dias WHY WE HAVE LAW? Why do we have law?? The are a number of reasons for having law and this is the main one - is that it gives rights to individuals and methods of enforcing these rights. Human beings have always lived together under rules of one kind or another. It does not matter where in the world, it does not matter in what age, or whether the society in which they lived was simple or a complex. Humans have always as a matter of necessity lived by rules. These rules are likely to be influenced by nature and the natural environment of the society in which people live. They may be influenced by religious or secular beliefs and they will cater for the ideas of right and wrong that have been developed over time to suit the society in which they live. Thinks about yourself????? If you form a club which include your family and friends, the first move is to choose a leader and make up some rules. ...read more.

Middle

We are required to wear seat belts because they were so many accidents and we learned from experience that in most cases they provide protection for injury. And rules which have gradually developed over the years. Example: People become the custom to do things in a particular way and that custom has become a settled and accepted way of behaviour. In this country there are certain rules which are there to be obeyed by everyone - by you, your parents and family and by your teachers. By everyone who is old enough to behave responsibly. If any of us break these rules we may be brought before a court of law. We may be punished by the court, or ordered to make amends in some way. Definition of Law Law is a rule established by authority, a body of rules the practise of which is authorised by a community or state. * It is also a command issued from a sovereign power to an inferior and enforced coercion. ...read more.

Conclusion

Administrative law: This controls how public bodies such as local councils, Government departments or Ministers should operate. Types of Private Law Law of Contract: An agreement between two or more persons that is intended to be legally binding. Family Law: This covers the law relating to marriage, divorce, and the responsibilities of parents to children. Property Law: This covers legal rights to property of all types. Tort Law: The word tort comes from the French meaning a wrong. A tort is a civil (not criminal) wrong other than a breach of contract or trust. In the case of contracts and trusts the parties agree the terms; it is a breach of those terms by one of the parties that constitutes the wrong, which may be addressed. A tort is a duty fixed by law that affects all persons - it does not arise from a prior agreement. Torts cover negligence, nuisance, trespass, and defamation. Welfare Law: This is concerned with the rights of individuals to obtain State benefits, and the rights and duties that arise with regard to housing and employment. ...read more.

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