• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

WHY WE HAVE LAW

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Odette Dias WHY WE HAVE LAW? Why do we have law?? The are a number of reasons for having law and this is the main one - is that it gives rights to individuals and methods of enforcing these rights. Human beings have always lived together under rules of one kind or another. It does not matter where in the world, it does not matter in what age, or whether the society in which they lived was simple or a complex. Humans have always as a matter of necessity lived by rules. These rules are likely to be influenced by nature and the natural environment of the society in which people live. They may be influenced by religious or secular beliefs and they will cater for the ideas of right and wrong that have been developed over time to suit the society in which they live. Thinks about yourself????? If you form a club which include your family and friends, the first move is to choose a leader and make up some rules. ...read more.

Middle

We are required to wear seat belts because they were so many accidents and we learned from experience that in most cases they provide protection for injury. And rules which have gradually developed over the years. Example: People become the custom to do things in a particular way and that custom has become a settled and accepted way of behaviour. In this country there are certain rules which are there to be obeyed by everyone - by you, your parents and family and by your teachers. By everyone who is old enough to behave responsibly. If any of us break these rules we may be brought before a court of law. We may be punished by the court, or ordered to make amends in some way. Definition of Law Law is a rule established by authority, a body of rules the practise of which is authorised by a community or state. * It is also a command issued from a sovereign power to an inferior and enforced coercion. ...read more.

Conclusion

Administrative law: This controls how public bodies such as local councils, Government departments or Ministers should operate. Types of Private Law Law of Contract: An agreement between two or more persons that is intended to be legally binding. Family Law: This covers the law relating to marriage, divorce, and the responsibilities of parents to children. Property Law: This covers legal rights to property of all types. Tort Law: The word tort comes from the French meaning a wrong. A tort is a civil (not criminal) wrong other than a breach of contract or trust. In the case of contracts and trusts the parties agree the terms; it is a breach of those terms by one of the parties that constitutes the wrong, which may be addressed. A tort is a duty fixed by law that affects all persons - it does not arise from a prior agreement. Torts cover negligence, nuisance, trespass, and defamation. Welfare Law: This is concerned with the rights of individuals to obtain State benefits, and the rights and duties that arise with regard to housing and employment. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Law section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Law essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Law - Resulting trusts

    4 star(s)

    In Re Vinogradoff12, the testatrix had transferred a �800 war loan into the joint names of herself and her infant granddaughter aged four. After the death of the testatrix it was held that the granddaughter held the war loan on a resulting trust for the testatrix's estate.

  2. Study the concept of Reasonable man and reasonability in tort law.

    and onto a nearby road causing an accident in which the plaintiffs husband died. The council were negligent because premises where small children are should be designed to ensure that children cannot wander off endangering themselves or others. But lord reid said that the teacher who had not noticed the

  1. Criminal Law (Offences against the person) - revision notes

    Voluntary manslaughter This is an entirely statutory offence brought about by common law. It was created by the 1957 HOMICIDE ACT This act created 3 specific defences to murder: - 1. Diminished Responsibility 1957 Homicide Act s2 2. Provocation 1957 Homicide Act s3 3.

  2. There are two types of trusts , private and public trusts. A private trust ...

    It is stated by Professor Moffat that the phrase 'advancement of education', "now constitutes a very wide category of charitable purposes"11. Furthermore Buckley J defined the phrase as "extending to the useful branch of human knowledge and its public dissemination"12.

  1. LAW OF TORTS II

    Whilst analysing the prospect of the parents receiving no compensation for their child, Kirby J explains at 143: "In the face of such natural obligations, it has been held that the law should refuse to countenance a legal proceeding that contravenes such deeply felt ethical and legal values."3 Here, Kirby

  2. Should juvenile offenders be treated differently to adult offenders?

    The Young Offenders Act 1997 (NSW) respond to a range of complex issues identified by the government in relation to Juvenile Justice. Part of this is a process of healing. Accessibility of legal systems depends on costs and knowledge of procedures and time.

  1. Property, Liberty, and the Law

    States of America, it states that the constitution will attempt "To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." With this statement come moral dilemmas.

  2. Is there a tort of invasion of privacy?

    The papers included letters to heads of state and to former ministers, and even 'intimate' correspondence. Under insolvency law, it was recognised by the court that, because Mr Aitken was a bankrupt, his estate should be transferred to the trustee in bankruptcy for him to 'realize' it (i.e.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work