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How is the Media Regulated - OfCom

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Introduction

Media Assignments 2 How is the media regulated? Media is regulated in a number of different ways one of which is Ofcom Ofcom's specific duties fall into six areas: 1. Ensuring the optimal use of the electro-magnetic spectrum 2. Ensuring that a wide range of electronic communications services - including high speed data services - is available throughout the UK 3. Ensuring a wide range of TV and radio services of high quality and wide appeal 4. Maintaining plurality in the provision of broadcasting 5. Applying adequate protection for audiences against offensive or harmful material 6. Applying adequate protection for audiences against unfairness or the infringement of privacy Ofcom's Regulatory Principles * Ofcom will regulate with a clearly articulated and publicly reviewed annual plan, with stated policy objectives. * Ofcom will intervene where there is a specific statutory duty to work towards a public policy goal which markets alone cannot achieve. * Ofcom will operate with a bias against intervention, but with a willingness to intervene firmly, promptly and effectively where required. * Ofcom will strive to ensure its interventions will be evidence-based, proportionate, consistent, accountable and transparent in both deliberation and outcome. * Ofcom will always seek the least intrusive regulatory mechanisms to achieve its policy objectives. ...read more.

Middle

Legal controls would be useless to those members of the public who could not afford legal action - and would mean protracted delays before complainants received redress. In our system of self regulation, effective redress is free and quick. Task 1 B Voluntary Codes of Practice UK Laws Control and regulation of the media Self regulation of the media This is done through: * Voluntary codes of practice Each media industry draws up its own rules on what they will or won't do This means that media companies will not use information or talk about certain people or topics that they feel are inappropriate For example * In order to self-regulate the BBC relies on a variety of instruments and codes. * The codes are the royal charter and a complimentary licence and the secretary of state for culture media and sport. * The BBC is controlled by a board of government with 12 members appointed by the government. * The board has two duties in regulation of the BBC: it defines corporate strategies and acts as trustees of the public interest they approve targets of services and monitor its performance and are responsible for ensuring that the public funding received through the licence fee is spent correctly. ...read more.

Conclusion

the times did not gossip about Rupert Murdoch private life when he split from his wife Global media ownership Lots of media empires buying lots of similar media companies lead to global media ownership which has happened on Rupert Murdoch's media empire. Independent of the media from politicians * Why is it important for the media to be independent from politicians? * The media is not 100% independent from the government. E.g. BBC has politicians on the board of directors * In an ideal world the media should be independent from politicians to encourage an unbiased opinion and view on stories * The media does not represent the balance of political opinion on what people vote e.g. the number of people who by papers who are pro government does not represent the number of people who actually support the pro government * News do not confine their political bias to the editorial column. The political comes across in every story within the paper * Broadcast media (radio and TV) have more of an obligation to remain politically unbiased this is due to stricter regulation from ofcom * Broadcast media also have to broadcast party political broadcasts from all parties * The reporting of new will be bias, however television should be a means of communication not persuasion ...read more.

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