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PEP for Rock Climbing

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Introduction

Strength Training for Rock Climbing Rock climbing is a sport that requires strength, coordination, flexibility, endurance, and balance. It is an excellent cross training activity for many other sports such as basketball, racquet sports, and baseball which require strengthening the intrinsic muscles of the feet, lower legs, and hand grip. Psychological demands also come into play; such as puzzle solving skills, team building, and the ability to plan movements in advance. Climbing is a physically challenging, vertical chess match. Common Muscle Imbalances Although every individual is different, there are common muscle imbalances seen in regular rock climbers. Muscles that are commonly tight and need to be stretched include: latissimus dorsi, biceps, forearm and finger flexors. Muscles that are commonly weak and need to be strengthened include: wrist and finger extensors, anterior tibialis, pectorals and anterior shoulder girdle, triceps, rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers, mid and lower trapezius, trunk stabilizers such as spinal erectors and abdominals. Imbalances may need to be addressed not only to improve climbing performance, but to prevent injury. Training Components Components of a properly designed climbing program include flexibility, strength training, proprioception, balance and agility, plyometrics, aerobic and anaerobic cardiovascular fitness. Perhaps the most important aspect of training for climbing involves learning movement patterns that involve body positioning, weight transfer, and learning how to move efficiently. Lower body strength is often overlooked in climbing training programs, but is an important aspect of a well planned program. ...read more.

Middle

A comprehensive technical rock climbing program includes 5 different periodized strength training workouts: 2 day off-season rotation, 2 day pre-season rotation, and 1 in-season workout. Each workout includes warm-up and cool down, dynamic warm-up, myofascial release and/or stretching, strength training exercises, and cardiovascular conditioning recommendations. In addition, there are several training suggestions to be done on an indoor climbing wall during the pre season. The supplemental program is a single workout that can be done in addition to regular rock climbing to prevent muscle imbalances and improve overall strength and endurance. There are currently supplemental programs for technical rock climbing and mountaineering. Athletes who will benefit the most from pre-designed workouts are self motivated, have basic weight training experience, are in good health and injury free. Workouts use free weights, stability balls, medicine balls, cables or tubing, plyometrics, and basic balance exercises. There are also a few myofascial release exercises that can be done using a biofoam roll. Training Program Program Information Target Population Price Purchase Comprehensive Rock Climbing Off Season Workout A: 10 exercises Off Season Workout B: 11 exercises Pre Season Workout A: 10 exercises Pre Season Workout B: 10 exercises In Season Workout: 10 exercises Dynamic Warm Up: 10 exercises Flexibility: 8 self myofascial release exercises and 17 stretches Cardiovascular Conditioning For technical rock climbers who are serious about improving their strength and conditioning for climbing. ...read more.

Conclusion

Rock climbing is made up of a series of reaches with both your hands and feet. New climbers report sore forearms, hands, fingers, and calf muscles. Beginners will start with easier climbs, first learning how to tie the safety knots and fasten their harnesses and helmets. Only then are they ready to attempt to climb under the supervision and aid of a trained guide. There are a number of safety and equipment issues to be learned prior to climbing without guidance. As you begin to learn to reach and stretch your limbs to find the very tiny holds that your fingers and toes will grip desperately, in order to stay on the wall, your body will be working to provide balance, coordination, and mental focus. Body Benefits Climbers will quickly begin to develop arm, back, finger, and core strength as a result of the many reaches and holds that are repeated over and over through the completion of one climb. Climbers are successful with more difficult ascents only after working to improve the strength and endurance of their calves, shoulders, and core; their agility; strength-to-weight ratio; and flexibility in hips and hamstrings. Rock climbing is an excellent sport to participate in to increase your level of fitness. If you have ever thought about giving rock climbing a try, start with an online search for a local indoor facility. Soon you'll be climbing the walls! Rock Climbing Addresses Four of the Five Components of Physical Fitness * muscular strength * muscular endurance * body composition * flexibility ...read more.

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