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Account For The Failure Of Fascism And Communism To Take Firm/Root In BritainIn The 1930s.

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Introduction

Account For The Failure Of Fascism And Communism To Take Firm/Root In Britain In The 1930s. In 1917 the Bolsheviks overthrew the constituent assembly and established the first communist government, this set example to others and in turn other countries government fell to the growing international force of fascism and communism. Even though the movements were gaining momentum, Great Britain was relatively untouched by this worldwide phenomenon. To those concerned with British internal security and public order, such as mi5, British fascism was not a real threat. It was rather more of a nuisance. This brings up the point of why Britain held strong and other governments worldwide collapse, what did Britain have that they didn't. Britain was one of the few countries that held strong against these radical movements, this example may have led to the end of fascist and communist government. This is why this topic is so important. Many groups surfaced in Britain representing Fascism, however Britain was unaffected unlike in Italy where fascism not only achieved regime status but left a legacy affecting the remainder of the century. The British Fascisti (BF), the Imperial Facist League (IFL) and the British Union of Fascists (BUF) ...read more.

Middle

Even with the increased support from the BF and the leadership of Oswald Mosley the BUF couldn't root themselves in British politic. The BUF completely collapsed along with Mosley's dream of creating a new civilisation. The BUF and Mosley's dream of a fascist revolution were destroyed due to the establishment making three serious decisions and acting on them. The first came after the BUF London Olympia meeting on 7 June 1934 when black shirt stewards attacked hecklers and Mosley perceived to be orchestrating violent expulsions from the rostrum. The proximity of this episode to the Night of Long Knives in Nazi Germany a few weeks later led Mosley's foremost benefactor, Lord Rothermere, to withdraw support of the Daily Mail, reducing the BUF from a membership peak of 50,000 in 1934 to 5,000 within a year. Henceforth the BUF became localised around the issue of agriculture and foreign usurpation of British labour. The second blow was the battle of Cable Street on 4 October 1936 where a confrontation between police and anti-fascists opposing a BUF march resulted in a pitched street battle. The resulting 1936 public order act banned political uniforms, language likely to cause a breach of the peace and stewarding at outdoor meetings. It also gave police chiefs the power to ban marches. ...read more.

Conclusion

This was viewed as barbaric to everyone worldwide, and the people of Britain believed that the British communist party were also part of this and viewed them as inhuman traitors. When Stalin signed the nazi soviet pact in august 1939, many saw fascism joining with communism, this meant mass loss of support because Hitler was viewed as the enemy and now the communist party had joined with him. Soviet Union's invasion of Finland, viewed in Britain as another act of unprovoked aggression, comparable to Hitler's. Communism and Fascism had been highly marginalized forces in British politics since the First World War. They were never able to establish themselves fully in Britain. Nobody actually knows the answer to why they didn't root themselves in British society like they had done in others; many believe that the idealism of the British people on superiority was a key point in rejecting these two movements. Britain did not want to be associated with anything not politically British and these movements were foreign, therefore resulting in rejection. Without this rejection there would have been a large possibility that Britain's society and governing body would have collapsed and British society would not have be what it is now. ...read more.

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