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Identify and explain two types of pressure groups. Illustrate your answer with examples

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Introduction

Identify and explain two types of pressure groups. Illustrate your answer with examples. A pressure group can be defined as a group of like-minded people who are organized with a view to influencing the formulation of government policy. Unlike political parties, they do not put forward candidates for election to government office and so they do not seek to become government, only to influence the outcome of government decisions. ...read more.

Middle

This may be because these groups are acceptable to the government or helpful or the consultation process. The fact that insider groups are part of the consultation process enables them to use direct methods in order to exert influence. Insider groups can be divided into High Profile Groups and Low Profile Groups. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the 1980s CND was excluded from any consultation process with the government because its aim was unacceptable to the Conservative government. Outsider groups can be divided into potential outsiders and ideological outsiders. An extreme example of an outsider group is the Irish Republican Army (IRA) which seeks a united Ireland but has been considered an illegitimate organization by the government. It was considered anti-constitutional because of its violent methods. ...read more.

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