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Indian Independence Coursework.

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Introduction

1. What do you learn from Source A about the origins of the 'Quit India' Campaign? The 'Quit India' campaign started when members of Congress were angry and frustrated with the British Labour government, which led the leaders of the Congress to announce the 'Quit India' campaign headed by Gandhi. Gandhi launched the 'Quit India' campaign during WW2 because of the failure of the Cripps mission. In source A Gandhi says ' how can we fight for democracy when we have not got it ourselves'. He is only thinking of this from one point of view. If he had thought about it from another perspective he would know that the Indians were not fighting for Britain but for India. The Japanese were on the borders of India and could invade it. Then the Indian people could forget the question of independence. But if they helped Britain fight the Japanese then they could start talking about independence as was promised to them. He then says ' I do not want Japan to win'. How could that be possible when he is telling his people not to fight and the Japanese are at the borders of India. Lastly he says ' I am sure that Britain cannot win unless the Indian people become free'. ...read more.

Middle

August 16 1946, Direct Action Day, which was meant to be a peaceful demonstration but it bought about communal violence, rioting and massacres in many paces in the north. Source F, a photograph taken in Calcutta on Direct Action Day shows, a Hindu temple set on fire presumably by Muslims and in response you can see the police using tear gas to drive the protesters back. This Direct Action Day made people aware of the vast differences between Hindus and Muslims. Gandhi was horrified by Direct Action Day because that was completely against his aim, he had wanted to achieve a united India but without any violence. Earlier in 1920 he said that by self-rule he meant two things, self-government for India and self-control. He believed the second was the way to achieve the first. So he accepted Jinnah's idea of Pakistan reluctantly. Source G is a report written by the commander-in-chief of the Indian Army, on the independence day of Pakistan. He says the army and police are powerless to stop the violence as the police were defecting and joining in the violence thus making it impossible to get it under control. 'The most disturbing feature here is the defection of the police who are mostly Muslim'. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Hundreds of Sikhs attacked the train' and 'My wife, who was seven months pregnant, was pressed on the belly resulting in an abortion a few hours later'. 'The train started only when nobody was left to kill'. This describes just one train journey from India to Pakistan so you could imagine what would have happened in residential areas of India. In source F you can see in the photograph that from one protest in one area in one day caused this much riot and bloodshed then you would have to keep these two people apart which in the long term would have to lead to partition. On the same day we have an eye-witness (Source E) account of what happened and to furthermore prove my point that India should have been partition, you should read the following statements from an unbiased Briton. "You could see a crop of one religion or another" "being beheaded into the river." "After the riot the river was literally choked with dead bodies." So coming to a conclusion I say the British did the right thing in partitioning India. They left India divided in two. The two countries were founded on the basis of religion, with Pakistan as an Islamic state and India as a secular one. India should have been partitioned because that would have been in the interests of both people. Mohammed Shuaib - 11NGO - Sapphire House < Indian Independence Coursework > ...read more.

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