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"The objective of establishing the Conservative Party as a party of government explains most of the actions of Disraeli in pas

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Introduction

"The objective of establishing the Conservative Party as a party of government explains most of the actions of Disraeli in passing the 1867 reform act" How valid is this interpretation of Disraeli's motives in passing the Second Reform act? This interpretation of Disraeli's motives highlights the idea of whether Disraeli passed the second Reform act through passion or merely to further his political career and boost the profile of the conservative party. The question that needs to be asked is whether or not Disraeli was a genuine social reformer? Robert Blake who wrote the extract has a firm view that Disraeli's motives were purely for a beneficiary reason. In his opinion the 1867 Reform act was a political stunt to boost the party. We must consider the source when looking at this argument, Robert Blake is an extremely well respected historian and there is a lot of evidence which backs up what he says giving his statement high validity. ...read more.

Middle

We know this from Disraeli's writing where he communicated his passion for passing a reform act. Therefore we can say that it was not Disraeli's sole aim to establish the conservative party through a second reform act but was merely a positive outcome from what Disraeli had set out to achieve from the beginning. However there is strong evidence to suggest that the conservatives wanted to outdo the liberals by gaining an advantage over the Liberals, passing a reform act would do this. Despite Disraeli's so called passion for passing a reform act we can argue it was simply propaganda leading up to the establishment of the conservative party through a Reform act. This would have been a sure fire way to secure a position in government. The origin of the statement also highly suggests that it is of high validity. ...read more.

Conclusion

In my opinion I believe that Disraeli's motives are clear and that the evidence that Disraeli passed the reform act to establish the conservative party is stronger than that he was a genuine social reformer. I believe that Disraeli's real interest was to establish the party and the way to do that was through a Reform act so of course he would show passion and interest towards it. I conclude that Disraeli was not a genuine social reformer. I believe he was an opportunist who used a previous governments failed act in order for his party and his career to flourish. Therefore from the evidence I can confidently say that I believe Disraeli was not a genuine reformer and that Robert Blake's interpretation of Disraeli's motives is a valid and accurate one. Kirsty Knibb 6e ...read more.

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