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A Close Reading of Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe.

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Introduction

Ashley Abboud British Literature II Dr. Keegan 21 October 2002 A Close Reading of Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe Within this passage, Crusoe rationalizes his blessings from God in a way that shows the depth of his own hypocrisy and selfishness. This is significant because it represents the climax of Crusoe's behavior and beliefs before truly turning to God. He shows his selfishness and hypocrisy in many ways, for example, he refers to himself in many titles representing a hierarchal order of his island. He chastises those who are "discontented," and he shows his "true colors" by only seeing his good fortune by others misfortune. These gestures of faith are only seen as whole hearted if taken out of context, but within the realm of the whole novel this passage's represents hypocrisy and selfishness, and also signifies the progression of man in the midst of hardship. ...read more.

Middle

Defoe creates a Pascal's Wager(er) out of Crusoe in this passage. He is wishy-washy in his beliefs. Crusoe believes himself king and Lord of the island and within a few lines he is chastising those who can not "admir'd the Hand of God's Providence" (Defoe,95). It seems that at a last minute, ditch effort in case God is listening, to be on the safe side, Crusoe feels he had better mention the good will of God, in case God might strike him down or another disaster will befall him. The reason it seems so insincere is due to the positioning of the glorification. It is between Crusoe's belief of himself as ruler and the reflection on why Crusoe is better off than most. ...read more.

Conclusion

the Word Thank God, so much as on my Mind, or in my Mouth; not in the greatest Distress, had I so much as a Thought to pray to him, or so much as to say Lord have Mercy upon me; no nor to mention the Name of God, unless it was to swear by, and blaspheme it. (96) This excerpt seems to hit the nail on the head. Crusoe finally realizes his belief in God was false. In conclusion, Crusoe's rationalization of material gain and God's love demonstrates the depth of his own hypocrisy and selfishness. This overall belief is the climax of Crusoe's behavior and beliefs before truly turning to God. Defoe had to highlight this pathetic belief system to emphasize Crusoe's epiphany, which signifies the progression of man in the midst of hardship. 1 Abboud ...read more.

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