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Discuss the theological and philosophical views on euthanasia.

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Euthanasia A. Euthanasia is the ending of life to end suffering. It comes from the Greek Thanatos meaning 'good death'. There are different types of euthanasia > Voluntary- when a person makes the decision themselves to die. > Compulsory- when a person doesn't make the decision themselves to die. > active- when something is given toe end someone's life e.g. a drug > Passive- when a person's treatment is taken away that is keeping them alive. They die from natural causes. There are different combinations > voluntary/active > compulsory/active > voluntary/passive > compulsory/passive The essay is getting you to think about theological and philosophical views on euthanasia. Many different religions possess different viewpoints. This is due to the fact that different religions interpret the Bible in different ways, for example the Roman Catholic church read the Bible and interpret it fundamentally and say 'that's a good reading, lets take it like that' but the Church of England would interpret it differently and say 'that's a good reading, what does it mean?'. The Bible has a great influence on all denominations of the Christian church. It influences Christians because it is their Holy Scripture, much like the Koran or the Jewish Scrolls. It influences the denominations differently however. ...read more.


They do believe that life is sacred and holy but when your time comes it is time to leave and we shouldn't put it back. The fact is all Christian denominations believe that life is holy and sacred but when a person's time comes they should be allowed to go peacefully and not be kept alive by machines and artificial respiration if the practice isn't going to make the person better. Different churches have different reactions to ' There are times when someone should be allowed to die rather than being kept alive against their will'. The Roman Catholics agree with this statement when it catatonia and vegetation is involved. They don't feel that keeping someone alive with machines is viable if the person isn't going to have a miraculous recovery. Otherwise the Roman Catholic Church has an absolute morality. No euthanasia, because switching off a machine isn't euthanasia because the person isn't going to get better anyway. The Catholics are fundamentalists, which means they take things as read. If the Bible says 'your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19) then it is. If you destroy life then you are destroying part of God. The Roman Catholic Church also believes in palliative care such as hospices. ...read more.


I think that if a patient wants to die then they should be allowed to. If they are in pain and want to spare themselves the physical pain and the suffering and they want to spare their family the mental anguish of watching them die then they should be allowed to. A person should be allowed to have a dignified death. I don't think Christians on the whole (taking into consideration the size of the Quakers in comparison to the Catholics) are in favour of Euthanasia because of the whole concept of death. A person's quality of life may be dismal now but what quality of life will the person have when they're dead. I also think that the arguments against euthanasia are fair and reasonable as long as someone ways up their arguments first. I agree with the reasons because they are important to the argument. I think that a Christian should keep an open mind on the case of euthanasia and the likes but I know they won't. I don't think that the reasons are particularly justified just because the Pope or the Bible says so, I also don't think that it is fair that one person can have such control over people's beliefs just because that person is the Pope. I think it is unfair that the arguments that the arguments both for and against euthanasia come from an ancient text that had been written and re-written thousands of times. ...read more.

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