• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

essential elements of 'Calvinism'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What does a study of Calvin's ideas and their implementation in Geneva in the years 1536-1564 lead you to believe were the essential elements of 'Calvinism'? John Calvin published his first edition of 'Institutes of the Christian Religion' in 1536 as he arrived in Geneva, having being expelled from his native France. Two years later, Calvin left Geneva due mainly to opposition from the council, which was increasingly dominated by Articulants who were strongly opposed Calvin and all that he stood for. From Geneva, Calvin travelled to Strasbourg where he learnt much from Strasbourg's reformer, Martin Bucer. During his time in Strasbourg Calvin worked on his institutes that expressed Calvin's key beliefs and was an important element to Calvinism. Calvin's theology also gave an all important representation of the reformers plans and ideas, and gave the people a clear portrayal of what was seen to be right and wrong, undoubtedly an important essence to Calvinism. The Ecclesiastical ordinances organised the reformation and were a great success to the movement. The consistory was also a key element in the success of Calvinism in the years of 1536-1564 with a strong ability to keep the population in order. ...read more.

Middle

The four books were The Knowledge of God and the Creator, The Knowledge of God the Redeemer in Christ, on the manner of receiving the grace of Christ and on the outward means by which god invites us into the fellowship of Christ. In his first book Calvin outlined his ideas about God, such as the ideas that God is omnipotent and omniscient. In his second Calvin explored sin, an important factor as Calvin perceived much of the Genevan population as "particularly unspiritual", (Randall). This book also gave the Genevan's security as made clear that if they knew the 'real truth' (Calvinism) they would go to heaven. This book therefore gave to the Genevan's in Calvinism and in turn support to Calvin. The third book outlined Calvin's ideas about the holy spirit belonging only to believers hearts and that God chooses who will have eternal life and who will be condemned, these ideas would have an important role in keeping control over the people and affecting their actions. The book would encourage citizens to behave if it makes clear that god has a decision over who goes to heaven and who goes to hell, it would also encourage people to embrace Calvinism if they wished to possess the Holy Spirit. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Institutes outlined the theology of Calvinism which gave a clear insight into Protestantism and the ideas behind it. Calvin's theology enabled the Genevan people to understand what they should believe in terms of religion and morality, i.e. what is right and what is wrong. The fact that Genevan's were clear on what they should believe in terms of religion, i.e. the Eucharist meant that the ideas could successfully spread. The Ecclesiastical Ordinances helped to give a strong sense of structure and organisation to the reformation and Calvinism itself. They also led the way for the Church and authorities to work together which would prove to be a crucial element in the success of Calvinism. The Consistory was also an essential element in Calvinism as it imposed strict moral and social regulation s on the Genevan population to keep order and maximise control. The Consistory also ensured that the citizens kept to the religion as they should, the people of Geneva could do little to resist the Consistory and could in turn do little to resist the spread of Calvinism. Finally the use of French missionaries was a strong element in the dispersal of Calvin's ideas across Geneva as well as the rest of Europe, without the missionaries spreading Calvin's words it is very doubtful that Calvinism would have grown as successfully as it did. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Places of Worship section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Places of Worship essays

  1. English Reformation

    Smart that Hunne did actually hold heretical opinions because when he was arrested in October 1514, he was found in possession of a Wycliffite Bible as well as other various non-specified heretical books. 20 The representativeness of Hunne's case against the practices of the Church is disputable.

  2. The two religious leaders of the reformation were MartinLuther and John Calvin.

    As to the manner of worship, Luther chose to retain altars and vestments; he prepared an order of liturgical service, but with the understanding that no church was bound to follow any set order.

  1. THE CONFESSIONS OF AUGSBURG On 31 October 1517, Dr. Martin Luther, professor of theology ...

    For Lutherans, Baptism is necessary for spiritual regeneration. Article IV, which is the doctrine of 'Justification by Faith'. This was one of the primary differences between Lutheran and Roman Catholic belief at that time. For Lutherans, 'Justification by Faith' was the only path to follow, as they believed that only through belief in Jesus could they be redeemed,

  2. The process whereby religion looses its influence over social life and society is known ...

    Table 2. Acceptance of Core Christian Beliefs in Republic of Ireland Belief in God Belief in life after death Belief in heaven Belief in hell Belief in sin 1981 EVS 95% 76% 83% 54% 85% 1998 ISSP 94% 78% 85% 53% - 1999 EVS 96% 80% 86% 54% 86% (Cassidy, 2002: 2)

  1. The storm-troopers of the counter reformation. Is this an accurate description of the Jesuits?

    He was certain to become a soldier in the Spanish soldier in the army but he had epiphany in 1521 after he was wounded in battle. 'In a series of deeply religious experiences resulting from a detailed thinking and 'feeling' through of the life and sufferings of Jesus, he became

  2. "Calvin's success in Geneva was due to the organisation and disciplineOf the movement rather ...

    His most important innovation was the incorporation of the church into city government; he immediately helped to restructure municipal government so that clergy would be involved in municipal decisions, particularly in disciplining the populace. He imposed a hierarchy on the Genevan church and began a series of statute reforms to impose a strict and uncompromising moral code on the city.

  1. To what extent was the destruction of privilege the most important consequence of the ...

    The destruction of privilege was brought about on the 4th of August 1789 by the Declaration of the rights of man and the August Decrees The French revolution has its roots deeply set in the Enlightenment; it was an intellectual movement, with a collective set of ideals which served as a foundation to the revolution.

  2. The Progression of Christianity from The Apostolic era - The Lutheran Reformation.

    religious conviction, how much to superstition and how much too political ambition." (Crowder, p74) Constantine's vision of a Cross and the inscription In hoc signo vinces (By this sign you shall conquer) could suggest any of these reasons, but his conversion is often attributed to political power.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work