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"It strengthens a Jewish family to share rituals at home" Do you agree? Give reasons to support your answer and show that you have thought about different points of view.

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Introduction

"It strengthens a Jewish family to share rituals at home" Do you agree? Give reasons to support your answer and show that you have thought about different points of view. There are two arguments about this statement that both need to be looked at. The main argument, which I see as being very persuasive, is that the home acts as a point from which the 'family' can gather and socialise, just be a family. The opposing argument is simply that by gathering together and spending time together anywhere can strengthen a family. I think that the sharing rituals in the home will strengthen the family more than if it was done elsewhere. In modern day society there are many debates and studies that state that the modern family does not spend enough time together. The simple solution would be to take specific times during the week when 'family' activities can take place. ...read more.

Middle

This is important so that the children feel they're needed and without them the meal wouldn't work. This is important as we often forget that children love to be involved. In carrying out these roles the family is acting out God's wishes that are for us to care for one another. The Bible saying when the husband states that his wife's value is greater than rubies shows this very well. These roles allow you to see how you should treat your family and friends and by doing them in the home, in the privacy of your own walls helps build confidence in younger family members and reminds the elders how to act. It makes the teenage members of the family feel responsible, knowing that they too are a part and if they weren't the festival/ritual simply wouldn't work. ...read more.

Conclusion

A family can spend times together in parks, restaurants and in the synagogue. In the synagogue especially a Jewish family will feel bonded because they have gone on an outing to praise God together. Whenever a family spends time together going out and talking, they are strengthening their family bonds. Some people feel that when rituals are carried out at home the children might resent this Especially older children who might be going through a rebellious adolescent period. They might feel that instead of taking part in rituals home they could be going out with friends. Being with the family doesn't only strengthen their faith and values but their personal values too. Personally I feel the arguments 'for' greatly outweigh those against and so I think that it is the home that strengthens the family but also the privacy that it provides. The statement may be true. However I think a more accurate statement could be that 'it strengthens the Jewish family to share religious rituals especially in the home'. ...read more.

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