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What do the contents of the tomb suggest about life in Ancient Egypt at the time of Tutankamun?

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Introduction

What do the contents of the tomb suggest about life in Ancient Egypt at the time of Tutankamun? Archaeological evidence from the tomb of Tutankhamun provides substantial information about life Kingdom Egypt in the eighteenth dynasty. From the archaeological evidence gained from the tombs conclusions can be drawn about religion and the afterlife, the everyday life of ancient Egyptians, of Government during the five hundred year period, and of the arts and sciences of the time. The tomb paintings reveal the nature of the Egyptian belief concerning the afterlife, and objects such as the golden burial mask, the miniature effigy of the king, the canopic shrine and miscellaneous pieces of furniture reveals the depth of their belief in the afterlife. The harpooner and the golden burial mask provides information about the role of Pharaoh in New Kingdom Egypt. The presence of wine jars and paintings of everyday life sheds light on the everyday Egyptians. The beauty of objects such as the golden burial mask, the necklace with the vulture pendant and ornaments such as the scarab bracelet ...read more.

Middle

This creation myth is at the heart of many of their religious myths. The golden burial mask, sheds light on the Egyptian belief in the afterlife, as one which in its initial stage as being dangerous because the presence of the cobras (ureus) is there to spit venom into anyone who might harm the king. The ornate quality of this mask reflects a deeply seated notion of the afterlife. The fact that the mask is supposed to protect the body reflects the Egyptian belief in the afterlife where bodies need to be preserved in order to unify the physical components of the body with its ka. The ankh, which Tutankhamun holds, and the presence of the god Khephri is a reflection of the belief that death is a rebirth into the next world. The wooden miniature effigy of the king, placed in tombs as a substitute for the deceased in case the god Osiris orders him to perform manual labour in the next life is indicative of a very strong belief in the afterlife. ...read more.

Conclusion

The presence of wine jars and paintings of everyday life sheds light on the everyday Egyptians. For example, wine was seen as a luxury in ancient Egypt though beer was not. From the presence of numerous sweet jars of wine it can be concluded that Tutankhamun in his lifetime enjoyed this beverage. The numerous paintings of everyday life for example scenes of hunting and gathering grapes are reflections of everyday activities that commonly occurred along the dark fertile Nile. The beauty of objects such as the golden burial mask, the necklace with the vulture pendant and ornaments such as the scarab bracelet and the mirror case is indicative of a technologically advanced society. The availability of gold and to a lesser extent silver, was partly the result of trading to areas such as the Aegean. In conclusion, it can be seen that from the archaeological evidence presented, conclusions about the way of life in Tutankhamun's time can be drawn. Archaeology provides extensive evidence concerning Egyptian religion, the afterlife, and the role of a Pharaoh and the technologically advanced state of Egypt at that time. ...read more.

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