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What is meant by conversion and how does it relate to religious experience

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Introduction

What is meant by conversion and how does it relate to religious experience? Conversion has different meanings to different people, and there are also many different ways to explain it. William James (who wrote 'The varieties of Religious Experience (1901)') describes conversion as "To be converted is to be regenerated, to receive grace, to experience religion, to gain an assurance, are so many phrases which denote the process...." What James is saying here is that conversion is to be completely changed, to gain something you haven't had before, to know what it is like to take part in a faith, to be aware that you have a promise. When you say somebody is 'converted', as a has being a religious term, it means that the person's perception has being changed towards life, the person now has religious aims which crate the regular core of their energy. ...read more.

Middle

Intellectual conversion is where an intense change in a person's attitude towards life/the world. The person is turning away from what the situation look likes/what seems to be happening, to what the situation actually is/what it actually looks like to a different perspective-they now see the situation with wisdom, they now have more intelligence to understand it. Moral conversion is just changing from thinking to doing. When I say from thinking to doing, I mean from judging, understanding, to taking action or making decisions. It's the acknowledgment of a person's self that the person is able to make their own decisions (wisely). Their decision won't be based on their personal contentment, but on things that are morally right. Lastly, there is religious conversion. This type of conversion is usually considered as the most important, the type that involves grace.(grace: God working though people) ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand, the individual could be satisfied with his/her conversion, and decide to commit his/herself to the conversion. Philosophical problems with religious conversions are also known about. The four I know of are 'How does the person experiencing this know it is God they are experiencing? Why are they not a universal experience? Religious pluralism: Believers from different religions refer to Jesus speaking to them or Mohammed, etc, surely this invalidates these experiences? And lastly, The Believers speaks of the universal experience happening to them but isn't this an infringement on free will? Theses are other challenges to conversion. In conclusion, I think that conversion can be given many different meanings, by many different people pf religions, but from looking at all the different perspectives, we can see that overall conversion has the same meaning in one way or another. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ife Amusan-HT7 Mr Roderman Religious Studies Hmwk ...read more.

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