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An experiment to investigate the reaction between marble chips and HCl

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An experiment to investigate the reaction between marble chips and HCl Preliminary Work I did a number of experiments before I started my actual experiment: i) I weighed 10.0g of CaCO3 chips, each one roughly 10-12mm large. I then placed it into a conical flask. I then added 50cm3 oh 2M HCl. All the gas that was given off was collected in a 100cm3 gas syringe. The apparatus was set up as shown below: *do not tighten the clamp too much as in clamping it too tightly it would mean that the glass would be squeezed and so hinder/affect the gas syringe as it collects the gas. When I carried out this experiment I encountered two problems. 1. As soon as I put the acid onto the chips there was a lot of gas given off. Before I could put the bung into place some of this gas escaped. The amount of gas which escaped is negligible as it only took me a second or two to place the bung into position. The fact remains that some gas did escape. However, since this is so small I chose to disregard the amount escaping. Also the volume of gas which escaped would have been replaced by the volume of gas pushed out when I put the bung into place. 2. With 10.0g of CaCO3 and 50cm3 of 2M HCl there was too much gas being produced too quickly. What I mean by this is that I collected in total excess of 100cm3, which is the capacity of one gas syringe. And the rate at which I collected this amount of gas was too fast for me too record accurately. Keeping in mind what happened in the first experiment I preformed a second one. This time I used 50cm3 1M HCl and 10.0g of CaCO3. Again I found that there was too much gas being produced at a slower rate that the first but nonetheless too quick for accurate readings. ...read more.

Middle

produced For 8cm3 of 0.5M HCl 0.5 � 8 = 0.004 = 0.002 � 24000 1000 2 = 48cm3 of CO2 being produced For 8cm3 of 0.25M HCl 0.25 � 8 = 0.002 = 0.001 � 24000 1000 2 = 24cm3 of CO2 being produced Obtaining Amount of CO2 produced with a certain molarity of HCl acid Time / secs 1M-exp1 1M-exp2 1M-av. 0.75M-exp1 0.75M-exp2 0.75M-av. 10.0 20.0 19.0 19.5 15.0 15.0 15.0 20.0 38.0 42.0 40.0 31.0 29.0 30.0 30.0 54.0 53.0 53.5 40.5 40.5 40.5 40.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 49.0 45.0 47.0 50.0 72.0 76.0 74.0 56.0 54.5 55.3 60.0 80.0 82.0 81.0 60.0 58.5 59.3 70.0 87.0 87.0 87.0 63.5 63.5 63.5 80.0 92.0 94.0 93.0 66.5 64.0 65.3 90.0 90.0 95.0 92.5 69.0 68.0 68.5 100.0 95.5 95.0 95.3 70.0 70.5 70.3 110.0 95.5 95.0 95.3 71.0 71.0 71.0 120.0 95.5 95.0 95.3 71.0 71.5 71.3 130.0 95.5 95.0 95.3 72.0 72.0 72.0 140.0 95.5 95.0 95.3 72.0 72.0 72.0 150.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 160.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 170.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 180.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 190.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 200.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 210.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 220.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 230.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 240.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 250.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 260.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 270.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 280.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 290.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 300.0 96.0 95.0 95.5 72.0 72.0 72.0 310.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 320.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 330.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 340.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 350.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 360.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 370.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 380.0 96.0 95.5 95.8 72.0 72.0 72.0 390.0 96.0 ...read more.

Conclusion

So to get around this problem you could repeat the experiment 3 times and then produce an average. Or you could wait a very long time until the reaction has finished. Unfortunately it is very difficult to tell whether or not the reaction has finished by looking at it. You could add a catalyst to the, this would speed up the reaction and so maybe the final volume of CO2 would come up sooner. But the problem with this is that then the initial rate becomes very difficult to measure and so by human error there would be mistakes in the readings. In my preliminary work I found that some gas escaped before you could place the bung into place. However, I did disregard that that would have made a big difference to the final volume of the CO2, but I could be wrong and maybe my final volumes are wrong because of this very reason. Therefore another improvement in the experiment is to add a sample bottle into the apparatus, this would keep the HCl away from the CaCO3. Therefore you could firmly place the bung into position and so no gas would escape in the time it takes to put the bung into place. Therefore there is another experiment which can be performed alongside this one to prove my prediction correct again or on its own for some more accurate results. In this experiment you weigh out a certain amount of CaCO3, let's say 10g. Then you add a certain amount of HCl, about 50cm3 and put both of these onto a weighing scale. The constant is the mass of the CaCO3 and the volume of the HCl. You vary the molarity, just like in my original experiment. After having placed the CaCO3 and HCl onto the weighing scale you simply tip the acid into the conical flask containing the CaCO3 and note the weight loss after every 10 seconds or 30 seconds or however many you want. The experiment is set up like this: Shehram Khattak 1 ...read more.

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