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An experiment to see how much sugar can be dissolved in different volumes of water

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Introduction

An experiment to see how much sugar can be dissolved in different volumes of water. I am going to do an experiment to test how much sugar can be dissolved in different volumes of water. I will measure different volumes of water out and then add a certain amount of sugar to it and stir it until it dissolves fully, I will keep adding more and more sugar until the sugar stops dissolving. In my experiment I could change: * The type of sugar that I use. * The temperature of the water. * The amount of water that I use. * The amount of sugar that is added to the water. In my experiment I will change: * The amount of water that I use. In my experiment I will use: Precise Digital Scales Granulated sugar Water Beaker Stopwatch 10mg measuring spoon Spoon Digital Thermometer Prediction My prediction is that as we gradually add the sugar to the water, it should be able to hold about the same volume of sugar, as there is water. I think this because as the sugar (the solute) is deposited into the water (the solvent), the water molecules are constantly moving in random directions, sugar molecules are broken off from the crystal by the collisions, they are then spread out by the continual movement of the water molecules. As more sugar is added to the water the solution becomes will become saturated and eventually it will become so saturated that there will not be any space left between the water molecules, so it wont be able to hold the sugar anymore, so it will stop dissolving and will be left at the bottom of the beaker. ...read more.

Middle

= 200ml Amount of sugar (g) Dissolving Time to Dissolve Looks 10 Yes 1.30 Clear 20 Yes 1.53 Clear 30 Yes 2.02 Clear 40 Yes 2.15 Clear 50 Yes 2.28 Clear 60 Yes 2.37 Clear 70 Yes 2.46 Clear 80 Yes 3.00 Clear 90 Yes 3.30 Slightly Translucent 100 Yes 3.40 Slightly Translucent 110 Yes 3.51 Slightly Translucent 120 Yes 4.10 Slightly Translucent 130 Yes 4.50 Slightly Translucent 140 Yes 5.01 Slightly Translucent 150 Yes 5.25 Slightly Translucent 160 Yes 5.40 Slightly Translucent 170 Yes 6.02 Translucent 180 Yes 6.34 Translucent 190 Yes 7.14 Translucent 200 Yes 7.49 Translucent 210 Yes 8.10 Translucent 220 Yes 9.20 Translucent 230 Yes 10.10 Translucent 240 No 12.00 Filled with granules of un-dissolved sugar Table 5 Volume of water (cm3) = 250ml Amount of sugar (g) Dissolving Time to Dissolve Looks 10 Yes 1.40 Clear 20 Yes 1.59 Clear 30 Yes 2.10 Clear 40 Yes 2.19 Clear 50 Yes 2.29 Clear 60 Yes 2.40 Clear 70 Yes 2.55 Clear 80 Yes 3.15 Clear 90 Yes 3.38 Clear 100 Yes 3.50 Clear 110 Yes 4.02 Clear 120 Yes 4.19 Clear 130 Yes 4.46 Clear 140 Yes 5.10 Clear 150 Yes 5.25 Slightly Translucent 160 Yes 5.40 Slightly Translucent 170 Yes 6.10 Slightly Translucent 180 Yes 6.39 Slightly Translucent 190 Yes 7.08 Slightly Translucent 200 Yes 7.32 Slightly Translucent 210 Yes 8.14 Slightly Translucent 220 Yes 8.49 Translucent 230 Yes 9.45 Translucent 240 Yes 9.55 Translucent 250 Yes 10.20 Translucent 260 Yes 11.34 Translucent 270 Yes 12.56 Translucent 280 No 15.00 Filled with granules of un-dissolved sugar Table 6 Volume of water (cm3) ...read more.

Conclusion

This could be because with the water being warmer it made the water molecules move around faster and bang into the sugar particles breaking them up and then carrying them away and spreading them around the solution of course to be absolutely sure of this I would have to do further testing. I also noticed that the sugar I was using was granulated and that all the smaller pieces of granulated sugar had fallen to the bottom and that all the larger pieces were on the top. Through the course of my test I used all the larger pieces and then when I got to the bottom I used them as well I measured them out to the same weight of 10 grams and then poured them into the water and stirred until they dissolved, I noticed that the time that it took for the smaller granules of granulated sugar to dissolve was quicker than the time it took for the larger granules to dissolve. This could be just a radical result but I do not think so, my theory is that because the sugar is in smaller pieces there is a greater surface area and so the water molecules dissolve the sugar faster because there is more places for it to knock into the sugar and break off a molecule and carry it away throughout the solution. I think that extra results need to be done with different types of sugar such as icing, caster, granulated and cubes to prove this. Craig Thompson 11TRM ...read more.

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