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Chemistry Gold

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

I am assigned to complete a science piece of coursework on Gold and alloying, to start my assignment I would like to start off with a question, 'What is Gold?' Gold is an element, a precious metal which is usually found in mines like pieces or nuggets and then extracted into a pure metal. I have found out that and going to explain the physical properties of gold. Alloys are a blend of mixture of metals, the alloys as part of gold are referred to as carats, with pure gold as 24 carat gold. Therefore each carat represents approximately 4.17% by weight of gold. For example, a piece of 9 carat jewellery contains 37.5% by weight of gold, pure gold is yellow which makes it alluring. Gold has many features, some of the features are that it is soft, shiny, malleable (to be able to bend, which describes a metal that can be sharped without breaking), ductile (malleable enough to be worked: able to be drawn out into wire or hammered into very thin sheets. The most prominent use of gold is in jewellery (an item of adornment). ...read more.

Middle

There are two types 18 Carat Gold: Pie Chart 5 Pie Chart 6 Pie Chart 7 Pie Chart 8 100% gold has absolutely no other mxture of metal that is why it is also called pure gold. Conclusion Advantages of gold alloys: * Alloys are much lighter than a metal, so that it is lighter when wearing a piece of jewellery. * It is stronger as they have gaps between the atoms to stop them from sliding over reach other; this stops them from being soft. * It is much cheaper than a metal * It maintains it shape, does not bend out of shape easily * Different coloured alloys * Does not rust with the oxygen in the air. * Does not tarnish * Gold alloys can easily be melted and so can be refashioned (reshaped). Disadvantages of gold alloys: * Gold alloys are not pure gold, so people who buy gold (alloys) feel as though they have bought pure gold, but in fact are deceived. * Not as marketable * Nickel (alloys) causes health problems * The process is cost effective, a lot of money is needed to make an alloy * It also takes up a lot of energy causing problems ...read more.

Conclusion

Websites also tend to be biased. Websites that are made can be information from only one side. This could make my research unreliable and inaccurate. Another issue with using the internet could be that the data could be over dated, meaning that the information on the websites maybe b over a long period of time. Scientists discover new things every day, scientists could find a new source of new information, this information is really old and people should find the new and latest information that scientists have found out. This means that the information I have researched may have not been changed or updated. The website which I used a lot during this was www.24carat.co.uk. This website could be biased as it sells jewellery, the jewellery sold may not be real as they say that some of their gold is pure but this cannot always be true. Some alloys use less than 50% of real gold in their jewellery. This is lying to the public and to those who buy products from this website. To improve this situation I could use more other sources to make my information more reliable. To make my data more reliable I could repeat the investigation and use websites of which information is honest and not biased. ...read more.

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Response to the question

The student either has not mentioned or has not been given a set question, but a title of 'Gold and Alloying'. All scientific investigations should include a hypothesis, an aim which lets the reader/examiner know what exactly you are investigating, ...

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Response to the question

The student either has not mentioned or has not been given a set question, but a title of 'Gold and Alloying'. All scientific investigations should include a hypothesis, an aim which lets the reader/examiner know what exactly you are investigating, and also tell the examiner that you know exactly what you are doing. As I have completed this coursework before, I am aware of what the requirements of this coursework was, so I can say that the students response to the question was fairly good and the student has included background information, data to prove points and an argument/conclusion and evaluation which is what is needed for this coursework. However, the coursework seems like it has no proper direction at times, and there are no scientific explanations whatsoever, which is a major downfall.

Level of analysis

The student has put in many graphs to show data and evidence of gold and alloying. Some of these graphs have one or two sentences of analysis underneath, which is not enough of an explanation. Furthermore, there is no reasoning as to why the graphs are there, the only obvious one being that it is about gold and alloying, yet there is nothing explaining why these particular graphs are shown over any other.

Quality of writing

Not only technical words are used on various accounts which is great, but they are also explained when first used as well, which is excellent. For improvement, it would have been better if the student wrote out the conclusion as an argument rather than bullet-pointed it as it is expected at GCSE level to do this. With regards to wording, I felt some parts could be worded better but other than that the coursework was reasonable.


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