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Finding out How much Acid there is in a Solution.

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Introduction

Finding out How much Acid there is in a Solution Aim The aim of this investigative experiment is to discover the accurate concentration of sulphuric acid (H2SO4), which is found in a solution. The concentration is thought to be between 0.05 mol dm�3 and 0.15 mol dm�3. I have been given access to anhydrous potassium carbonate (K2CO3) and a range of indicators. Plan In order to obtain the concentration of the acid in the solution I have to titre the known solution of potassium carbonate with the unknown sulphuric acid. The indicator I will be using to indicate when the reaction is fully completed is methyl orange. This is because I am using a strong acid and a weak alkali and methyl orange is the most appropriate indicator for this type of acid-alkali titration. To begin with I will have to prepare a standard solution of potassium carbonate that will be used in the titration with sulphuric acid. The potassium carbonate is of known strength and volume in contrast with the unknown concentration of sulphuric acid. This is the equation for the titration: H2SO4 (aq) ...read more.

Middle

� MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR SAFETY GLASSES ON DURING THE WHOLE EXPERIMENT Potassium carbonate Although the solution I am using is very dilute I should still be aware that contact with eyes, skin and clothing must be avoided. As such I am to be wearing goggles and a lab coat. Also any slippages would cause the area to become slippery and dangerous, if they are not cleaned up quickly. Methyl orange The same precautions apply for this as did with the potassium carbonate. Sulphuric Acid It is very corrosive. If it is swallowed, wash out mouth and give one or two glasses of water. Don't induce vomiting. Seek medical advice as soon as possible. If it is splashed into the eye flood the eye with gently running tap water for 10 minutes. Seek medical advice. If it is spilt on clothes or skin remove the clothes quickly and wipe as much liquid as possible away with a dry clothe before drenching the area with lots of water. If a large area of skin was affected or blistering seek medical advice. If it is spilt in the laboratory, wear eye protection and gloves and cover with mineral absorbent and scoop into a bucket. ...read more.

Conclusion

� The burette and pipette may not have been thoroughly washed out with the solutions used. � The conical flask may not have been thoroughly washed out with distilled water between titres. � The end point may not be accurate if the solution from the burette is not added drop by drop with continuous swirling. � Too much or too little indicator may have been added each time It is not possible to place a value on the effect of human error on the reliability and accuracy of results. However, further repetition of the experiment would limit the effect human error has on results. Improvements to the investigation would be mainly aiming to reduce the human error. This could be done by using equipment that displays values and measurements digitally, or detect the colour change more accurately. Overall I do not believe my results could have been that inaccurate seeing as my titres were the same. I feel that the procedure allowed me to discover the accurate concentration of the acid to a fairly accurate and reliable degree. Sources: � Chemical Ideas - Salters Advanced Chemistry (2nd Edition). � Chemistry - Ann and Patrick Fullick (2nd Edition). � Hazards in the Chemical Laboratory - Edited by G.D Muir (2nd Edition). � Google Images - Keyword: Titration Tahamtan Pishgharavol Chemistry Coursework: Titration 1 ...read more.

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