• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Finding out how much acidthere is in a solution

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Finding out how much acid there is in a solution Plan In order to find the accurate concentration of the sulphuric acid, the molarity of the acid will be determined using a titration, the process of the gradual addition of a solution of known concentration to a second solution until the solute in the second solution has completely reacted. The neutralisation reaction between sulphuric acid and sodium carbonate will be used in order to find out the concentration of the acid. H2SO4 (aq) + Na2CO3 (aq) = Na2SO4 (aq) + H2O (l) + CO2 (g) The reactants react in a 1:1 mole ratio and so as we know that the sulphuric acid is of a concentration between 0.05 and 0.15 mol dm-3, therefore sodium carbonate of a similar concentration will be needed to neutralise the sulphuric acid. Firstly an aqueous sodium carbonate solution must be made. As the solution should be approximately 0.1 mol dm-3, 0.1 moles should be weighed out to mix with 1000cm3 or 0.025 moles with 250cm3 Apparatus Sodium carbonate Weighing bottle/top pan balance Sulphuric acid (250cm3) Distilled water 250cm3 volumetric flask 100cm3 conical flask Burette Burette clamp and stand 100cm3 beaker x2 25cm3 pipette 1cm3 pipette Pipette filler Small funnel 1 White tile Spatula Stirring Rod Making the solution Mass of sodium carbonate = (23x2) ...read more.

Middle

and a weak alkali (sodium carbonate) This is therefore approprite for the experiment I am doing. Before the titration can take place the apparatus must be set up. Before the burette can be clamped in place it is important that it it rinsed through with sulphuric acid to ensure that any chemicals remaining in the burette are disposedof and so there is no contamination which may affect the results. This is best done by placing a small amount of sulphuric acid and tilting and rotating the buret as to rinse out the entire inside wall and allowing some of the acid to run through the buret tip. Clamp the burette to the clamp and fill it up with sulphuric acid past the zero mark, and slowly open the burette tap until the bottom of the sulphuric acid meniscus is on the zero mark allowing the acid to flow through the tap and place the conical flask containing the sodium carbonate underneath on top of a white tile, this tile will help colour changes to be seen more clearly. The acid can now start to be added to the conical flask in small amounts at a time, swirling the flask after each addition. ...read more.

Conclusion

x 100 = 0.16% Uncertainty using balance = (0.008/2.56) x 100 = 0.31% Uncertainty using volumetric flask = (0.2/250) x 100 = 0.08% Uncertainty using burette = (0.08/23.45) x 100 = 0.34% Finding the percentage of uncertainty of each stage of the experiment allows me to calculate the total percentage uncertainty of the experiment Total percentage uncertainty = 0.16 + 0.31 + 0.08 + 0.34 = 0.89% Calculating the concentration of the acid H2SO4 (aq) + Na2CO3 (aq) = Na2SO4 (aq) + H2O (l) + CO2 (g) Since sodium carbonate and sulphuric acid react in a 1:1 mole ratio - Moles of H2SO4 = moles of Na2CO3 Conc. H2SO4 x Vol. H2SO4 = Conc. Na2CO3 x Vol. Na2CO3 Therefore Conc. H2SO4 = Conc. Na2CO3 x Vol. Na2CO3 / Vol. H2SO4 = 1 x 25 / 23.45 = 1.06 moldmcm-3 As the overall uncertanty of the experiment was 0.89 I can say that the absolute uncertanty is 1.06 x 0.0089 = 0.009 therefore - concentration of H2SO4 = 1.06 +/- 0.009 mol dm-3 Sources 1) 'Experimental error and error analysis' - Chemical Review Magazine - Nov'01 - by Alasdair Thorpe Maria Sideras ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Aqueous Chemistry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Aqueous Chemistry essays

  1. How much Iron (II) in 100 grams of Spinach Oleracea?

    concentrations of 0.08 mol dm-3, 0.07 mol dm-3, 0.06 mol dm-3, 0.05 mol dm-3, 0.04 mol dm-3 , 0.03 mol dm-3, 0.02 mol dm-2 and 0.01 mol dm-3. 2) Make up a solution of Copper Sulphate solution 0.1 mol dm-3 by completing the following steps : a.

  2. Finding out how much acid there is in a solution.

    * Repeat your titration a number of times and at least once during the assessment ask your teacher to observe you perform a titration run. Repeat your titration until you feel that you have achieved results that will allow you to find a good average and an accurate concentration of the acid solution.

  1. In order to find out the exact concentration of sulphuric acid, I will have ...

    Firstly the acid solution should contain san excess amount of H+(aq). At some point these ions should disperse randomly through out the possible solution. If basic OH(aq) ions are added to the solution, they will travel through the solution, until they meet a H+(aq)

  2. To carry out a titration between a strong acid and a weak alkali, to ...

    To make my measurements more precise, I used a pipette as I got closer to the graduation mark, as it is easier to put in distilled water drop by drop. There is more accuracy in this procedure, and the graduated volumetric flask was at eye level, so that I knew when the meniscus was sitting on the graduation mark.

  1. In this experiment I am finding out how much sulphuric acid is present in ...

    x Molar Mass = Mass 0.025 x 106 = 2.65g 2.65g of anhydrous sodium carbonate crystals are needed. Apparatus used 1 Graduated Conical Flask 2 Volumetric Flask (250cm3) -Used to prepare standard solutions of solute 3 Burette 4 Pipette- to deliver accurate volume of sodium carbonate solution into the conical

  2. Find out how much acid there is in a solution

    The burette should be held in a horizontal position and the water must be swirled around, to remove any leftover liquid from previous experiments. * The distilled water should be drained from the burette through the open tap above a sink.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work