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In our experiment we hope to find out about ions in different materials. We will do this by demonstrating and observing the results of a flame test.

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Introduction

Qualitative Analysis. Sam Perrett Unit 1 - Assignment 4. Introduction. In our experiment we hope to find out about ions in different materials. We will do this by demonstrating and observing the results of a flame test. Equipment. Necessary Equipment: 1 Bunsen Burner 1 Heat Mat 1 Glass Of Water 1 Gass Of Hydrochloric Acid 1 Pair Of Safety Goggles Risk Assessment Material Hazard What Could Go Wrong? Risk? (high/med/low) Safety precautions Bunsen Burner Flame Flame could cause a fire to break out Medium Take extra care when dealing with flames. Heat Mat Fragments Of Chemicals Could get chemical waste on hands and cosume it Low Do not handle with bear skin. ...read more.

Middle

Record the reaction/s onto the worksheets. Sterilise the heating rod in the Hydrochloric Acid so that its ready for the next material. Repeat steps 2 - 5 for all of the materials until you have a fully completed results table. These were the observations made during the flame test. Positive ion Observation Sodium Great Orange Flame Which Then Liquidised. Potassium Light Pink Flame Calcium Bright Flame Which Fizzed And Liquidised Copper Extremely Flurecent Blue + Green Flashes Identification Of Unknown Salts. Introduction. In this section of the assignment we made mixtures with different unknown materials with a liquid to try and find out what they were. ...read more.

Conclusion

Test For Observation Absent/Present Carbonate No Effect A Sulphate Went White and Opaque P Chloride Transparent similar to H2O A Copper Turned to a thick, sticky Green Solution A Iron Light Brown texture P Colour Produced = Orange Ions Present? Sodium Conclusion: Salt A contains 'Sodium' ions and 'Chlorine' ions. This leads us to the conclusion that Salt A is 'Sodium Chloride'. Salt B Test For Observation Absent/Present Carbonate N/A A Sulphate Went Pale White P Chloride Transparent As A Copper Sludgey Green Solution A Iron Light Brown Solution P Colour Produced = Orange Ions Present? Sodium Conclusion: Salt B contains 'Iron 3' ions and 'Sulphate' ions. This means that Salt B is 'Iron Sulphate'. ...read more.

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